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Full text of "Pilgrim"











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1955 THE PILGRIM 

PUBLISHED SINCE 1921 

Yearbook of Plymouth High School 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 


1956 








Principal - EDGAR MONGAN Adviser - ROLAND HOLMES 


- 




TABLE OF CONTENTS 










INTRODUCTION 




PAGE 


* 




Pilgrim Staff 




3 






Dedication 




6 






Listen to Benjamin Franklin 




10 






Administration 




11 






From Japan 




12 






SENIOR SECTION 










Senior Class 




14 






Best Girl Citizen, Best Boy Citizen 




42 






We Say Good-Bye 




43 






Class Poem 




44 






Class Song 




45 






Believe it or Not 




46 






Class Will 




48 






What's What With the Seniors 




51 






"The Most" 




52 






Senior Serenade 




54 






STUDENT LIFE 










Junior Class 




56 






Sophomore Class 




58 






School Log 




62 






P.H.S. Dictionary 




64 






From the Past 




65 






Literary Section 




66 






Insight on the Class of '56 




70 


«i 




THE CURRICULUM 










English 




72 






Math 




73 






Science 




74 






Latin 




80 






French 




81 






Art 




82 






Music 




83 






Social Studies 




86 






Commercial 




87 






Driver Education 




88 






Basic Mechanics 




88 






Physical Education 




89 






Home Arts 




90 






Psychology, Global Geography 




91 






ACTIVITIES 










Honor Society 




94 






Honor Group 




95 






Student Activities Society 




96 






Ten-Cent-a-Week Collectors, Bank Tellers 




97 






Radio Club, Office Assistants 




98 






Library Staff, Press Club 




99 






Sunsetters 




100 






SPORTS 










Cheerleaders 




103 






Football 




104 






Cross Country 




107 






Boys' Basketball 




108 






Baseball 




113 






Hockey 




114 






Girls* Basketball 




115 






Tennis, Softball 




117 






STEVENS THE FLORIST, Flowers for all occasions 







PILGRIM STAFF 
1955 -- 1956 

Editor-in-Chief — Claire Vancini 

Assistant Editors — Dana Bumpus, George Sampson 

Literary Staff — Marguerite Hasz, Editor 

Marsha Bent, Edna Bradley, Jane Pimental, Judith Benassi, Bernadette 
Ledo, Paula Coombs, Helen Holman 

Business Staff — William Horton, Editor 

James Marsh, Mary Phyllis Ryan, Allan Sherman, Nan Richardson, 
Christopher Pyle, Charles Skulsky, Donald Miskelly, Virginia Scagliar- 
ini, Liza Rossi 

Art Staff — Diana Youngman, Editor 

Mary Lahey, Norma Scotto, Frank Cavacco, Marie Serra, Sylvia Os- 
borne, Esther Wood, Bettie Crowell, Robert Torrance, Linda Rossi 

Senior Statistics — Joan Whiting, Editor 

Robert Miskelly, Arlene Herries, Paula Coombs, Linda Cappella 

Photography Staff — Mary Phyllis Ryan, Editor 

Paul Zanotti, Paula Coombs, Barbara Bratti, Tara Sturgis, Patricia 
Barrett 

Senior Specials — Brenda Pioppi, Editor 

Sandra Balboni, Glen Simmons, Robert Barufaldi, Sandra Ward, Janice 
Cavicchi, Judie Remick 

School News — iGail Sears, Editor 

Boys' Sports Editors — Clyde Brini: Football, Basketball 
James Swanton: Cross Country 

Girls' Sports — Jean Fryermuth, Editor 
Paula Coombs, Asst. 

Typists — Mary Waitt, Marylou Enos, Patricia Murphy, Elissa Benassi 



The school gets all the benefit, 
The students all the fame, 
The printer gets the money, 
But the staff gets all the blame. 

Pilgrim 1935 



Congratulations to the Class of 1956, LELAND'S 







PILGRIM STAFF 

Fourth Row: Robert Torrance, Paul Douglas, Charles Skulsky, Christopher Pyle, Robert 
Miskelly, Paul Zanotti, James Swanton, Donald Miskelly, Glen Simmons, James 
Marsh, Allan Sherman. 

Third Row: Gail Sears, Linda Harris, Ann Cecco, Dana Bumpus, Janet Balboni, Marietta 
Nelson, Marsha Bent, Judith Benassi, Marylou Enos, Linda Mattioli, Elissa Benassi, 
Ruby Zanini, Sandra Ward. 

Second Row: Diana Youngman, Paula Coombs, Esther Wood, Jane Pimental, Edna Brad- 
ley, Nancy Gulhang, Nan Richardson, Clare Banzi, Virginia Scagliarini, Arlene Her- 
ries, Diane Silva, Brenda Pioppi, Sandra Balboni, Judie Remick, Mr. Roland Holmes. 

First Row: Mary Waitt, Norma Scotto, Jean Fryermuth, Joan Whiting, Linda Rossi, Clyde 
Brini, Mary Phyllis Ryan, Bernadette Ledo, Marguerite Hasz, Linda Cappella, Sylvia 
Osborne, Janice Cavicchi, Marie Serra. 

Kneeling: Mary Lahey, Barbara Bratti, Suzanne Lekburg, Tara Sturgis, Liza Rossi, Judie 
Bartlett. 





SMITH'S INCORPORATED 



THE EDITOR'S CORNER 



LINES FOR LIFE 



To view the years that lie ahead, 
We find some things that should be said, 
Some hopes and fears and, if you please, 
We may include some prophecies. 

We like to feel by '57, 
We won't be on our way to heaven; 
And though the atomic missile looms, 
We'll not be hurried to our tombs. 

For peace we pray, with all it means — 
But since our world is full of fiends, 
We cannot now throw in our lot 
With those who say that arms are rot. 

Let no one think we're not sincere, 
Because we have this healthy fear, 
It's merely that we know the odds, 
With ruthless men who act like gods. 

Now some there are who think the Reds, 
Should all be murdered in their beds, 
Or at the very least they might, 
Be given some atomic fright. 

We hope that in the years to come, 
These noisy voices will be dumb, 
And saner, surer plans take shape, 
Lest man revert back to the ape. 

We pray for patience, prudence both; 
We're anti-wrath and anti-sloth. 
We're always losing friends, it seems, 
Because, like this, we flee extremes. 

UNESCO, NATO and the rest 
From us get nothing but the best; 
So Benelux and EDC 
And hopes for solidarity. 



At home we hope the years will see 
A new high in prosperity, 
That there will be in slack in crime 
And tranquil order all the time. 

Subversives, traitors, saboteurs 
And all related kind of curs 
In red or pink or blue or white 
Might just as well keep out of sight. 

We rather feel their goose is cooked, 
Some are in jail and some are booked; 
Since Edgar and the FBI 
Will hardly let a one get by. 

Send all our clergy strength and vision 
For duty, piety and decision. 
Remind them, as their work they do, 
That laymen work for Jesus, too. 

Bless those who teach and those who write, 
Those who are just and honest and bright. 
A special grace for editors, too, 
Forgive them — they know what they do! 

For heretics and unbelievers, 
For any kind of world deceivers, 
Please grant a light that leads the way 
Out of the night into the day. 

We could go on and try to send 
A list almost without an end. 
But it remains alone to mention, 
What occupies our first attention — 

Bless our staff who try to make 
Breadcrumb news seem more like cake. 
The folks who advertise and read us, 
We hope will realize they need us. 

CLAIRE VANCINI 
Editor 



OLD COLONY INTERSTATE THEATRE 



TO 7HZ TACUlTy 

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MR. EDGAR MONGAN 

"And another thing" 
Principal — 34 years in P.H.S. 

— once taught English and 
math — wonderful speaker — 
at music on Fridays — we 
don't envy him his job — un- 
usual writing — always sym- 
pathetic and willing to listen 

— a lot on his mind — his con- 
federate cap — a black Buick 
convert — Saturday night 
dances — The Caine Mutiny 
letter — hears from those in 
the service. 

Georgetown University, B. A. 




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MRS. MIRIAM RALMOND 

"This is how you operate" 
English IV — 33 years in 
P.H.S. — her psychological 
tests — Dean of Girls — very 
helpful in guidance — many 
compositions — deep under- 
standing of the things import- 
ant to us — those honor group 
meetings — second period gives 
her trouble? — seen in a 
green and yellow Olds — 
Oregon Trail is going, going, 
gone! 
Boston University, B.A. 




MISS NELLIE LOCKLIN 

"It doesn't make a particle 
of difference" 

Geometry, Algebra II, and 
Trigonometry — 16 years in 
P.H.S. — plays the piano in 
emergencies — neat as a pin 
— has an interest in bright 
pupils — won't tolerate lazi- 
ness — very understanding — 
the excuses she has to put up 
with! — wants an invention to 
substitute for her chalk and 
string affairs — makes good 
sandwiches — the magic an- 
swer book. 

Boston University, B.A.; Col- 
umbia University, M.A. in Ed. 



MR. DONALD WILSON 

"Food for thought" 
Psychology — 3 years in 
P.H.S. — he makes you think 

— flashy sport jackets — 
senior counselor — has his 
own office — chats with Mr. 
Pyle — easy to talk to — he 
types! — found in the office 

— accentuate the positive — 
Claire and her "pitchers" — 
those discussions in psych! — 
honor society — how's your 
thesis coming? — from here 
to B.U. 

Boston University, B.S. in 
B.A.; Tufts College, Ed. M.; 
now studying at Boston Uni- 
versity for his doctor's in Ed. 




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MISS HELEN JOHNSON 

"Eyes on your books" 
Typing I, II, Bookkeeping II 
— 33 years in P.H.S. — cas- 
tanets to stop her from snap- 
ping her fingers — likes to 
play cupid — such a tiny 
voice! — wants 30 electric 
typewriters — often seen in 
the office — found in 201 — 
glad there are no question- 
naires this year — dislikes 
having her picture taken. 
Salem State Teachers College, 
B.S. in Ed.; Boston University, 
M.C.S. 



MR. JOHN PACHECO 

"Let's try it again" 
Band and Orchestra leader — 
17 years in P.H.S. — his cig- 
ars — the football games — 
his plaid hat — the four drum 
majors — secret desire: buy 
a hair brush and use it! — 
finally got new uniforms — 
bothers Mrs. Whiting — little 
Chuck — proud of his march- 
ing girls — picture him with 
curls — our senior dance — 
found in the auditorium — 
crazy mixed-up character. 
New England Conservatory of 
Music. 




3tov*& 



H--.-:'- • . 



MR. ARTHUR PYLE 

"It doesn't pay to cheat, kids" 
American History — 25 years 
in P.H.S. — never loses his 
temper — in charge of the 
library — very reasonable and 
approachable — knows the 
history of Plymouth from 
1620 to 1956 — interested in 
automation — dislikes waiting 
for people — have you got 
your sticker, Mr. Pyle? — I 
will not talk in study hall, I 

will not !! 

Massachusetts State College, 
B.S.; Boston University, M. 
Ed.; now studying at Bridge- 
water State Teachers College. 






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MRS. LYDIA GARDNER 

"Open your manual to " 

Stenography I and II, Tran- 
scription, Office Practice, 
General Clerical Practice — 
27 years in P.H.S. — dislikes 
interruptions in her classes — 
a sweet tooth — our Junior 
Prom! — wonderful sense of 
humor — always in a hurry — 
ought to give singing lessons 

— nice handwriting — an ap- 
ple a day — pet peeve: Bill 

— an electric typewriter. 
Salem State Teachers College, 
B.S. in Ed.; Boston Universi- 
ty, M.C.S. 



MISS JEANNETTE JACQUES 

"Again" 

French I, II, III — 25 years in 

P.H.S. — her bulletin boards 

— wants elastic periods — 
beautiful clothes — what the 
map of France hides! — Gail 

— another trip to Paris — 
dislikes exchanging glances — 
a sound proof room with a 
tape recorder — those rare 



smiles — a yellow 


evening 


gown. 




Worcester State 


Teachers 


College, B.S. in Ed. 


; Middle- 


bury College, M.A. 







MR. MARIO ROMANO 

"All 10((-a-week collectors to 
304" 

Basic Math I and 11 — 21 
years in P.H.S. — athletic di- 
rector — in charge of 100-a- 
week plan — in the doorway 
between 303 and 304 — at the 
games with the coaches — 
those pep rallies — Pete — his 
messengers from study hall 
— full of enthusiasm — lime 
socks — gives up his recess 
so we can study in 304 — a 
wonderful teacher. 
Boston College, Ph.B.; Boston 
College Graduate School, Ed. 
M. 




MR. RICHARD SMILEY 

"Develop a good mental atti- 
tude" 

Driver Education — 32 years 
in P.H.S. — he's brave! — dis- 
likes people who don't pay 
attention — once a biologist — 
the Pontiac — human talking 
machines — great patience — 
who gave him his grey hair? 
— late for class — his art 
work on the blackboard — 
"Don't you see?" — his wait- 
resses — the scrapbook of 
clippings — Plymouth or New 
Hampshire? 
Colgate University, B.S. 



MISS ELLEN DOWNEY 

"Joan, will you come here, 
please?" 

World History — 10 years in 
P.H.S. — those crazy student 
council meetings — Saturday 
night dances — world travel- 
er — fun to be with — the 
conventions — needs a scooter 
and a whip to patrol her sixth 
period study hall — makes 
history live again — her last 
year on the student council — 
trouble with Biz — lots of 
maps in 203. 

Bridgewater State Teachers 
College; University of Cali- 
fornia. 








MISS MARJORIE KNIGHT 

"Why don't you go out for 
hockey?" 

Girls' Physical Education — 4 
years in P.H.S. — wants win- 
ning teams — tennis, hockey, 
basketball, and Softball — we 
bring her our problems — Phil 

— bawls us out when we need 
it! — doesn't like "Midgie" — 
picture her with long hair — 
nice dresser — fun to be with 

— real fast in basketball. 
Bridgewater State Teacher's 
College, B.S. in Ed. 



MR. HAROLD ROGERS 

"What's you do that for?" 
Boys' Physical Education — 7 
years in P.H.S. — basketball 
coach — his "little" boy — 
misses Larry and Frannie — 
always has a joke — sweats 
at the games — track ■ — shy 
at pep rallies — a wiffle — 
secret desire: play a shut- 
out — can easily see why he 
has to drink milk — Ware- 
ham and Silver Lake. 
Boston University, B.S. in Ed. 




MR. JOHN TAVERNELLI 

"Now, class' 

Latin II, III, IV — 2 years in 
P.H.S. — semper fidelis — 
came from P. J.H.S. — where 
does he have his hair cut? — 
quiet and sincere nature — 
always a suit — those Latin 
Club meetings — makes the 
Greek myths live — "Ulysses" 
— likes television — that big 
senior Latin class — wears 
out shoes with all the walking 
he does. 

Boston University, B.A.; Bos- 
ton University, M.A. 





MRS. MARGARET BROWN 

"Get out in the hall!" 
Art I, II, III — 17 years in 
P.H.S. — passion for the ab- 
stract — always with "Spitzie" 

— to Paris — those classes on 
the Green are too much — 
pet peeves: Torrence and 
Ottino — adores ballet — ab- 
hors rock'n roll — talks with 
her hands — a tidy desk, just 
once — recipe for collapse: 
graduation and the yearbook 

— off to Spain. 

Sacker School of Design. 



MRS. ALICE URANN 

"I'm only forty-five" 
English III, IV — 13 years in 
P.H.S. — should write an ad- 
vice column — proud she's 
Irish — Eileen, Champ, and 
"Papa" — writing a play — 
Provincetown — "C'est la Vie!" 
— calls herself the terror of 
the third floor — we're all her 
"chillun" — "Wish You Were 
Here" — flashy blazers — hey, 
Ma! 

Bridgewater State Teachers 
College, B.S. in Ed. 





MR. ARMEN MILTON 

"Just a minute" 
Chorus — 1 year in P.H.S. — 
the Glee Club — his smile 
wrinkles — helps us to know 
good music — great sense of 
humor — sings from the heart 

— seen removing his jacket 
after the second chorus — 
needs boys for the Glee Club 

— that graduation music — 
"He" — from jazz to opera. 
Boston Conservatory of Mu- 
sic; University of Manchester, 
England; Boston University, 
B.S.; University of Maine. 




MR. CLAIBORNE YOUNG 

"Quiet!!!" 

Biology — 12 years in P.H.S. 

— the Science Fair — Sun- 
setters — our Sophomore Hop 

— very smooth dancer — his 
farm — could use drawing 
lessons so we could tell a 
rabbit from a horse — inter- 
ested in young people — 
Sophomore girls — presump- 
tuous and persistent prevari- 
cators — pigeons, chickens, 
and rats! 

University of New Hamp- 
shire, B.S.; Cornell Univer- 
sity, M.S. 



MRS. HELEN BAGNALL 

"Have I seen all the make-up 
cards?" 

Economic Geography, Typing 
I — she teaches us our geo- 
graphy — young at heart — 
oh, that typing class; A, S, D, 
F, J, K, L,: — always willing 
to lend a hand — seen at the 
basketball games — S.A.S. — 
she and Miss Knight — that 
crazy gray Studebaker — chic 
dresser — her cottage at the 
pond. 

Boston University; Salem 
State Teachers College, B.S. 
in Ed. 








MRS. MARGARET HEALY 

"Don't tattle on me, Edna" 
English II, French I — 1 year 
in P.H.S. — "To err is human; 
to forgive, divine" — her fam- 
ily — blue earrings — smart 
dresser — oh, those china-blue 
efyes — Mainoimet — has a 
chauffeur to school — "some- 
thing that will knock you for 
a loop" — cool, calm, and col- 
lected — "I'll be rooting for 
you, boys!" — young at heart. 
Emmanuel College, A.B.; Bos- 
ton University, A.M.; Univer- 
sity of Connecticut, Law 
School. 



MR. DONALD MULLEN 

"Of course we're going to 
win!" 

World History, Global Geo- 
graphy, Problems of Demo- 
cracy .English II — 2 years in 
P.H.S. — football coach — seen 
with Mr. Romano — those 
confidential whispers in third 
period study — pep rallies — 
called "Coach" — curly hair 
— he has problems (football 
or democracy?) — an "Irish- 
man"! — between Plymouth 
and New Hampshire — "Mr. 
X." 

University of New Hamp- 
shire, B.A.; Bridgewater State 
Teachers College, M. Ed. 



MRS. ALICE KINGMAN 

"Quiet, please" 
Home Arts — 10 years in 
P.H.S. — a good cook is price- 
less — dislikes seats without 
backs — knows what to do 
in an emergency — at the 
basketball games — her room 
is the teachers' lunch room — 
lovely lady dressed in white 
— from pizza to biscuits — "A 
stitch in time saves nine." 
Framingham Teachers Col- 
lege, B.S. 



*H&a» 



MR. CARLO GUIDOBONI 

"You looking for trouble?" 
Basic Mechanics and Auto 
Mechanics — 17 years in P.H.S. 
— wants more girls in his 
classes — joking with Jean — 
we wouldn't want to get into 
an argument with him! — tall 
and good looking — red Stu- 
debaker — teasing "Irish" — 
wants an entire car to dem- 
onstrate to his pupils — seen 
with a briefcase. 
Tuft's College, B.S. in Ed.; 
Boston University, M. Ed.; 
studied at Notre Dame, Col- 
umbia University, and Bridge- 
water State Teachers College. 






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15 



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MISS ELIZABETH KELLY 

"All right! Now . . . ." 
Bookkeeping I, Business Eco- 
nomics — 26 years in P.H.S. — 
very efficient and helpful — 
handles lots of money — well- 
liked by all — dislikes people 
who can't follow directions 
and who carve initials in their 
desks — jokes with Mr. Pa- 
checo and Mr. Guidoboni — 
they call her "Irish" — 
thoughtful of others — that 
strange handwriting — polio 
fund collections — trim and 
neat. 
Bay Path Institute. 



MR. JOHN PACKARD 

"Is this green or blue?" 
Chemistry, Physics, Radio — 
21 years in P.H.S. — WIKMU 
— breaks bottles — wants a 
servant to keep the supply 
closet clean — an interest in 
the sky — what's anywho? — 
rarely loses his temper, but 
when he does! — a Harvard 
man — the "rotten egg" ex- 
periment — an artist in dis- 
guise. 

Harvard, B.S. in Physics; 
Harvard, Ed. M. in School 
Administration. 




MR. ROLAND HOLMES 

"I'd like to see you sometime" 
English II, III — 10 years in 
P.H.S. — a new home — Pil- 
grim adviser — loves his 
work — very friendly — bari- 
tone voice — those bow ties 
— Naval reserve — his three 
boys — "Ask Holmsie, he will 
tell you what scouting"s all 
about — " — referee for Bill 
and Claire's arguments — sta- 
tion wagon — always carrying 
a pile of books — so well- 
liked! 

Bowdoin, B.S. in Biology; 
studying at Boston University 
for his masters. 



MRS. MARION WHITING 

"A girl to the office, please" 
Secretary to Mr. Mongan — 
5 years in P.H.S. — always 
busy — indispensable — hand- 
les our make-up cards — has 
a staff to help her — goes out 
of her way to be of service 
to us — Jo — the teachers' 
servant — late slips — always 
found in the office — teased 
by Mr. Wilson — Mickey 
Mouse's mother — often seen 
at our dances. 
Chandler School for Women. 







10 



WORDS OF WISDOM 




Listen to Benjamin Franklin: 

"He that hath a trade hath an Estate; and he that 
hath a Calling hath an Office of Profit and Honour; 
but then the Trade must be worked at, and the Call- 
ing well followed or neither the Estate nor the Office 
will enable us to pay our Taxes." 

"Remember that money is of the prolific, gen- 
erating nature. Money can beget money, and its off- 
spring can beget more, and so on. . . . The more there 
is of it, the more it produces every turning, so that 
the profits rise quicker and quicker. He that kills 
a breeding sow, destroys all her offspring to the 
thousandth generation. He that murders a crown, 
destroys all that it might have produced, even scores 
of pounds." 

"He that is known to pay punctually and exactly 
to the time he promises, may at any time, and on any 
occasion, raise all the money his friends can spare. . . 
After industry and frugality, nothing contributes 
more to the raising of a young man in the world than 
punctuality and justice in all his dealings; therefore 
never keep borrowed money an hour beyond the 
time you promised, lest a disappointment shut up 
your friend's purse forever." 



". . . . be prodigal of effort and economical of time. Spending money 
never brings Prosperity, and Work is the only way to Welfare." 

"So what signifies wishing and hoping for better Times. We may 
make these Times better, if we bestir ourselves. Industry need not wish 
.... and he that lives upon Hope dies fasting. There are no Gains without 
Pains." 

"But, ah, think what you do when you run in Debt; you give to another 
Power over your Liberty." 

"(1) It is necessary for me to be extremely frugal for some time, till 
I have paid what I owe; and (2) to apply myself industriously to whatever 
business I take in hand, and not divert my mind from my business by any 
foolish project of suddenly growing rich; for industry and patience are the 
surest means of plenty." 

"Justice is as strictly due between neighbor Nations as between neigh- 
bor Citizens. A Highwayman is as much a Robber when he plunders in a 
Gang, as when single; and a Nation that makes an unjust War, is only a 
great Gang. ... A War. . . . can hardly be just on both sides." 

Heed Benjamin Franklin! 



PEPSI COLA BOTTLING COMPANY 



11 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Standing: Mr. Robert Bowler, Mr. Spencer Brewster, Mr. Alton Cavicchi. 
Seated: Mr. Mauro Canevazzi, Mr. Ralph Weaver, Mr. Donald Welch, Mr. Joseph 
Contente. 



At the left: Mr. Donald Welch, Superintendent 
of Schools 

Mr. Welch graduated from Bridgewater State 
Teachers College, B.S. in Ed., and from Boston 
University, Ed. M., and earned a certificate of 
advanced graduate specialization. After teach- 
ing in Middleboro Junior High and becoming 
principal of the elementary schools of Middle- 
boro, Mr. Welch was assistant principal of the 
junior high and the elementary school principal 
in Bridgewater. After coming to Plymouth, he 
was the Cornish and Burton School principal, 
acting superintendent, assistant superintendent, 
and became superintendent in November, 1952. 

At the right: Mr. Walter Snyder, Assistant Sup- 
erintendent of Schools 

Mr. Snyder graduated from the University of 
Pittsburgh, B.S. and M. Ed., and is doing ad- 
vance graduate work in School Administration 
at Harvard, where he is also working for his 
doctors. For four years, he taught in Baltimore 
County, before coming to Plymouth last August. 
Mr. Snyder is working with the faculty on re- 
vising the P.H.S. curriculum. 





CUSTODIANS 

Back Row: Mr. Thomas Goodwin, Mr. John McCarthy, Mr. 

Joseph Bernardo. 
Front Row: Mr. Peter Savard, Mr. John Robischeau, Mr. 

Francis Balboni. 



CAFETERIA HELP 

Left to Right: Mrs. Lillian Thomas, Miss Mary Zucchi, 
Mrs. Mary Scagliarini, Miss Helene Doherty, Mrs. Dora 
Zoccolante, Mr. Thomas Longhi. 






12 




English III, Misawa, H. S. 



Misawa Air Base 
Honshu, Japan 
January 28, 1956 

To the Pupils of Plymouth High School: 

Greetings from Japan. Although greatly removed in time 
and space, none of you at this moment is very far away, for 
memory reduces to a minimum the months and miles that 
separate friends. 

You ask me what Japan is like. Well, in partial answer 
to your question, Japan is an exotic land of pagodas, Shinto 
shrines, and Torii gates; of sculptured pines and feathery bam- 
boo; of southern rains and Siberian snows; of tiny homes with 
sliding doors and highly polished floors. Kimono-clad women 
carrying children on their backs are a common sight; the 
staccato clippity-clop of getas an ordinary sound. Strictly ad- 
hered to is the custom of removing one's shoes before enter- 
ing a home. 

All this, however, represents only one aspect of the total 
picture, for Japan is also a modern, up-to-date country. Its 
cities, like those at home, are bustling centers of activity with 
heavy traffic, conservatively dressed people in native or West- 
ern grab, modern buildings, and well-stocked shops. Indeed, 
Japan's world-famous silks and brocades, its lacquerware, 
china, cultured pearls, and lovely prints make it a shopper's 
paradise. 

Figuring prominently as an integral part of Japanese life is a strong aesthetic sense. 
Beauty lies in the landscape; it is found in the homes and in the very souls of people. 
Delighting the traveller's eye is the well-tilled, neatly cultivated countryside, studded 
with small towns and villages nestling in leafy loveliness against a background of green 
pines and, occasionally, of tall, graceful elms delicately etched against the sky. 

The Japanese people themselves live, work, and play much as people do in America. 
In the morning .they rise, have breakfast, and rush off to work or school, boarding 
crowded subways, trains, or streetcars and, in many cases, buses or bicycles. For rec- 
reation, they attend the latest movies or listen to the radio. They celebrate national 
holidays, travel, and visit friends. Right now with a foot of snow covering Honshu, the 
chief concern of both Americans and Japanese is keeping warm and enjoying the winter 
sports. 

Lacking modern plumbing facilities as well as heating systems to protect them against 
severe winters, the Japanese are, nevertheless, an extremely clean people who love hot 
baths and fresh air. They're extremely fond of baseball, skiing, animals and children. 
As one becomes better acquainted with the Japanese, he realizes that they differ greatly 
amongst themselves in looks and personality as is the case with all peoples. He also 
looks behind phyical features to facial expressions which more frequently than not mir- 
ror kindness, intelligence, patience, and a poised deference. The visitor finds the Jap- 
anese an honest, literate people (90% of the population) who are as polite to strangers 
as to one another — a people as eager to know and to understand us as we are to know 
and understand them. 

There's so much more that I'd like to tell you 
about Japan that it's difficult to know where to stop 
and I realize that although I've written much, I've 
said little, hardly mentioning important and inter- 
esting subjects like Japanese art, drama, religion, 
government, and education — the warp and woof of 
any culture and civilization. For the present, though, 
may I leave this parting thought with you — namely, 
that no matter what the immediate or remote future 
may bring, I thank the Lord for having given me 
this wonderful opportunity of getting to know a 
people who, fundamentally, have the same human 
needs, thoughts, and desires as we. 

My best wishes to all of you, and as the Japanese 
say, "Sayonara." 

Sincerely, 

IRIS E. ALBERTINI 




Imperial Palace Grounds, Tokyo 



JAY'S ARMY and NAVY STORE 



13 



SENIORS 



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14 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




ROBERT MISKELLY 
President 

As our class president, Bob is one of the best 
liked guys at Plymouth High School. He is 
always willing to help others with any job 
whether big or little. We will remember him 
as the uncle in "Dust of the Road," an out- 
standing member of the Honor Society, and 
a hustler on the cross country team. Bob has 
also been a credit to the Student Activities 
Society and the Pilgrim Staff. He well de- 
serves the honor we have bestowed on him. 




WILLIAM HORTON 
Vice-President 

Bill has a sparkling personality and a sense 
of humor that is equaled by few. His "hi," 
spoken in a Southern accent, is enough to 
brighten anyone's day. We thank Virginia 
for sending Bill to us in the September of 
1954. His enthusiasm about everything he 
does has spread to the faculty and students 
alike. Although Managing Editor of the Pil- 
grim, he found time to serve on many of 
the class committees. We salute Bill as a 
credit to our class and our school. 



JOAN WHITING 

Secretary 

As an active member in most of the societies 
and associations in P.H.S., Jo has proven 
herself an indispensable member of our class. 
For three years she has been a drum major- 
ette, member of the Student Activities Soci- 
ety, and a class officer. Jo is sure to be a 
success in whatever field she enters. She is 
an avid sports fan as she proved by scoring 
the girls' basketball games and cheering the 
boys' team to victory. Jo has also been a 
member of the Honor Society and the Honor 
Group. 




V,*'. ■ 

HP 



GERALD PIMENTAL 

Treasurer 

Jerry, the character with the crew cut and 
laughing brown eyes, has served as class 
treasurer for the past two years. A most re- 
freshing personality and sense of humor has 
made him very popular. He loves sports, 
particularly basketball and football. His car- 
with-no-back-seat has been a means of trans- 
portation to many of us when we were in a 
fix. As head ten-cent-a-week collector in 
304, Jerry has given a great service to the 
school. 




WIKSTEN BROTHERS DAIRY, Middleboro 




J^^ 




ff 



15 





BERNARD JOSEPH ANDREWS 

"Say, Babeee!" 

"Bernie" — headed for the service — wants 
to be Allen Freed's right-hand man — loves 
to snooze — plays records — future pitcher 
for the Braves — seen scooping cranberries 
in Carver — with the boys at "Stang's" — 
Jerry — station WINS, New York — the Jor- 
dan Hospital food — dislikes square people 
— his goatee! 

Activities: Baseball: 1, 2, 3; Football: 1, 2. 



DAVID PAUL ANTI 



,-n. 



"Have you seen Di? ' 



k 



V 

er at 



"Dave" — •permanent boarder at locker 230 

— secretly desires to be an underwater 
photographer — eat, eat, eat — Di and Ed — 
Mrs. Kingman's son -r- electronics technician 

— loafs in his spare time — playing hookey? 

— Navy bound — Hogan's University — a 
one-gal guy — those curly locks — smooth 
dresser. 



Activities: Dance Committees. 



V 




SANDRA MARIE . BALBONI 

'• , VWait for me" ttlM . . 

"Sandy" — wants fa get married — eiivies 
tall' people — Jerry — seen with Bren, Ruby, 
Frannie -J- picture her a medical secretary 
likes macaroni and chicken — dislikes 
compositions — oh, sq, quiet in the corridors 
— believes in thie last minute policy — likes 
golf because someone else does — Mr. 
Holmes for President — "Latin II js killing 

Activities: Game Helper; Pilgrim Staff: 3. 



no 

- 




A e "Bra^ 
«_) v Navjf^*- hi 
Wtagtinatio 



^CLEVE^A 
itufQ Hdr/ura' 



LETT 




omet 

ycie -NovesL- jHftysics — 

Nay V — Jp rTiaceJ a sn»rts 

drivesk/Dad^ oil "track 

ers — wkrt^the^twy^ at, 

us.-jgwrt— Jaarn ma)c trjg. 

witri)"Ma"jBnd English III — loves 




Digs the jive 





Going, going, gone! 




Perfect form 



■■ 




Get up and go!! 



16 






5 









I1JH BARTJLETT 






ie" — headea/A'for nursing school — 
s B.U. TaOuTy- listening to Jo's prob- 
lems — loves Marromet? — sparks the cheer- 
leader squad— ypsych and Mr. Wilson — 
who has the "neatest" locker on the third 
floor? — playing "king of the mountain" 
and "Uncle Wiggley" — S.A.S. worker — 
seen with Jo — smart dresser. 

Activities: Hockey: 1-2; Sophomore Class 
Treasurer; Basketball: 1-3; Class Colors 
Committee; Dance Committees; Cheer- 
leader: 2-3; Honor/Group, S.A^Sy: 3. 




"Ya, ho, Rinny 

"Lissa" — oh, good, it's lunch time — J. P. — 
to become a secretary and travel around 
the world — eliminate tests at P.H.S. — hates 
the distance of 40 miles between here and 
there — Di, Syl, Claire, Pauline — helped 
make Mr. Holmes our favorite teacher — 
destined to marry a millionaire. 

Activities: Bank Teller; Ticket Seller; Pil- 
grim Staff; 3. 



PAUL BESEGAI 

^rtain junior girl! — our S.A.S. 

, /tfresi4£nirv^with Hap, Frank, and Jerry — 

J* Cane\*jzzif s Market — pet peeve: Saturday 

F-4 \]F ja/^Sht/fyrth/vW date — Bentley bound — per- 

f rsoWalit^ pjuV— y fan of Miss Kelly — young 

h-' (I tt»n with I 3 llorn — loves sports — the Sox 

V i^will win next year — Sammy White's man- 

^k^ ager — always on time — likes Miss Downey. 

Activities: Baseball: 1-2-3; Basketball: 1-2-3; 
Junior Class President; S.A.S. Vice- 
President: 2; S.A.S. President: 3; Dance 
Committees; Class Colors Committee; 
Class Gift Committee; Band; Orchestra; 
Delegate to Student Government Day. 



Too busy to bother 



17 




ATTI 



seen with 

but likes 

ts to be 

ans to join 

cian — wants 

H.S.; I won- 

his curls. 

2; Dance Com- 



MANUEL JAMES CABRAL 

Coon" — 'racTin-^^bjtion is to be like Mar- 
lon Brando — inlays p«$Ljn his spare time — 
seen with the North Plymouth Japys at the 
bowling alleys — likes pork ch6p5""feu^_not 
girls — favorrt|3wriQcI_is study -^to^ilqfrriitf 
plans for the future. 

Activities: Game Helper: 1. 



,L 



J 




*A 



MARJORffi/^RAJQE CALHOUN 



•'Cottonpp^L^ W 

"Midgie — seeh with Marjy/^nd \Shirley — 
,and Mrl Kingman — doe'srftj like 
ata— i roller skates ty^Xo be 
ij wok. -nsecriruii depifies^y A$nite Caddy 
jc^nvertWl^K^nW ■ u^ZcJws sjrrt Roller 
SkatingjpKihk^l^plans' fto get married — 
watches TV arfd listens to Allan Freed's 




rock and roll music 
periods at P.H.S. 



would have shorter 




ner — 
6d — to tra- 
dislikes not 
of those gals 
t — plans to get mar- 
graduates — the mailman is 
one of our beautiful senior 




He missed his cue 





ifl m 


i.i 
I 




mk 


Ok 


E ' 



A gay blade 



*C7 



**V 




The bell's about to ring 








V 

^ 



\ 



\> 



M 



V 




, Di, and Pat — 
a great f^n of \ Migs .Kelly — oh* to kiss 
Marlon Brando, — loves to crqchet in 6th 
^ period "study — working at the Old Colony 
Laundry — ambitiqn: ' marriage —\ food, food, 
food^ — at TassY'sy with . the gang — do away 
with homeworR — Jan's car — champion 
cheeper at, the' games. \ 

Activities: Bank ' TelleV >Vic 






ley. 
Khk" 

ays ea 
period 9tui r „ 
but mfcstly D 
lei'jL^ Plymm^ 
, spVrkllng /t ^ferson, 
, \ V"ShusH, ivDick 
to oWWfB- 
1 Aliington| 

y^Act&itiestt 



the ,pho 
Wda; 

weel| Collec 
. Club: 
( ^^jTunkir/^Class Secretary; C 
2-it 'Captain: 3; Class Colors 
Flowers Committees; Pilgrim 1 




- al- 
fifth 
ri6n and Jkmda 
e "Van Twiilk- 
and /iT^ssys — 
Keflly — 
would like 
danc( s/ — 

s y 1; 

mittees; 

erleaders: 

if t, and 




It's real, too 




MARGIE HELEN CLAUSSON 

"It sojueezes my bones completely" 

"Margie" — loves raw liver, roller skating, 
and bowling — Urann fan — typing — at 
Cooper's and George's — hates dogs that 
drool and people who say 'tch-tch" — seen 
N with P.C. and Andy — she talks all the time 
— secretly desires kids with curly hair — 
plarts to be a secretary — put a lounge in 
P.H.S. — she's engaged! 

Activities: Dance Committees. 




But the floor's slippery 



19 



i 

















Miss AKnightLfajv — seen 
amPlVfala £/feecret de^i 
gyn& oi&iaf' — alwavsV&n 
Bo,giorA' / got? — Mo/irfl li 

gvertt cojfflff of 









EUFELIA ^ORVEL* 



She's co-captain 



/ 



/ IFurEL^V^fORTE^D^ 

Effie" — seeh with Rosi€f Jan ancrGinny 
Ljj^/let to Td^s-^fore.^ fills up" — 
haxfi— fellow J»'o mew o^'K hater — Mr. 
Holmes fan;*/- her licaneitf' — seen slaving" at 
the pld Colony Lauj^ary -T-lUfes to hjit/lhe 
ke^*Ttypewrito^ trja^ is)^'in frqiht^i a TV 




'D^on'f^ge^ 

'jP 

nie 

baU/ /games 



sfeffh WiW\EffieiT>at,lWe, and Jan- 
nie — ^t Tassys — ybig'gest ehflerer atbasket- 
VciN/ 4*amoc'J\.r>h. vthosp' customers — .Wants 

ires to be 



i/to gcLto'Nef 



i « to go^cy in aw. zorK-sy.... 

W x Eddie Fisher's secretary — likep 



oh^ythose ^zustorriers 
York — s.ecretly de 

stenography 
ajto! ^J r A Gardner — spends ' spare time 
sleeping — Agoing Vto take life easy after 
P^S. — one ,91 the Woolworth girls. 

ie^XLa 



-A^tivitie^XLab 



Assistant: 1; Ticket Seller. 





o eat an- 
( unusual aV- 
bowling \aufl 
ing withNJZ: 
neat. 



California for the Monroe 

with S^evV^and Den — likes 

dislikes homework 

period — at the 

fan of Mr. Holmes — danc- 

— fun to be with — always 




Activities: Door checker. 




I'm hungry, that's all 





CAROL CURRIER 



"PurJkperriitkle''^— craves , pizza and fried 
flfi/ns y\l{kes t$ '47 Ford — seen with Bob- 
by — can't stand snakes and two-faced peo- 
«' pie —'her favorite teacher is Mrs. Urann — 
favorite subject is art — plans to get mar- 
l/ried A7 wants less homework at P.H.S. — 
beautiful girl with beautiful hair — future 
"lAimber please" girl. 



J 



Activities: Pilgrim. 




■fa 

Waiting for someone? 





She has the qualifications 







"Doug" — music, music, music -f- dislikes 
wise guys — the guy with all the ideas in 
S.A.S. — Denny and Dick — auto mechanics 
and Mr. Guidoboni — track star — E. B. — 
one of our D.J.'s — sawing wood — hand- 
some as they come — Benny Goodman fan 
— that certain soph — to build a track field 
for P.H.S. — headed for the 1960 Olympics. 

Activities: Cross Country: 1-2-3; Dance Com- 
mittees; Baseball: 1-2; S.A.S.: 3. 



RICHARD BRUCE DOYON 

e sea — to hunt, fish, 
a lot of fresh air as he 
windows in 303 — always 
en at South Pond — with 
ng to burn P.H.S. — that 
likes physics — can make any- 
thing "out of sea water and tin cans. 

Activities: 10(}-a-week Collector. 




I 



What are you waiting for?? 

V Ml 




Bet it's stuffed!! 






I 

4 



ny 



'M 



21 



DANIEL VINCENT DUARTE 



What's 1 - iip?v 






"Pop Knickerbocker" — seen with Paul, 
Pete, Den and Woody — lives for bowling — 
history and Miss Kelly — nates homelessons 

— wants r his own Thunderbird — to be a 
C.P.A. -1*- would love to make $10,000 a year 

— always on the go — found at Balboni's 
Drug Store — plans to attend college — 
would like to hire attractive teachers for 
P.H.S. 




MARY LOU ENOS 

"Oh! Fiddles" 

"Stacy" — future lab technician — loves his- 
tory — would make a good diplomat — seen 
working in Currier's — "time to get a new 
school" — takes in our cash at recess — Bill's 
right hand — the "perseverance" gal — her 
little sisters — Tassy's — a certain guy — 
great typist — never a dull moment. 

Activities: Bank Teller; Dance Committees; 
Softball: 1; Pilgrim Staff. 



8^Lugi" 

'kBev" %■ sael l I 
e\en. jsi/ai n 
dfAzrs. BHgnal 
es and fla cok ( 
hopes fm go/to 

Wi^be 

$s a bee 

would Mi 




ibrary — with 

likes English 

assy's with French 

Phing 
er — 
busy 
vhat 



Activities: 10#-a-week Collector. 



^ 



v 



Vo 






SHANNON BROOKS FOUNTAIN 

" 26 80,"* vW*\ 

"Brooks" — Carver belle — the distance be- 
tween Carver and Plymouth — seen with 
Sandra, Janet, and Lynn — "Can I have the 
Merc?" — could sleep all day — that long 
walk from Carver to Plymouth — would 
like to send Jean, Bob, and Eartha Kitt 
to the moon — future editor of the O.C.M. 

— a Miss Kelly fan — her crazy blue Ford 

— Pop. 

Activities: Dance Committees. 




Make it a zombie 




My eyes are on you 




Books; all day, books! 




Give me information, please 



22 











JEAN DICKSON FREYERMUTH 

"Sure you can!" 

"Jeannie" — college — wants to drive like 
Judy and Ernie — oh, those week-ends — 
keeps the mailmen busy — with Ernie, 
Jeanette and a letter — secret desire: to out- 
wit Bill — our athletic senior — seen be- 
hind the counter at Woolworth's — spare 
time: what's that — our senior dance — 
basketball and more basketball. 

Activities: Hockey: 1-2-3; Softball: 1-2-3; 
Basketball: 1-2-3; Tennis: 1-2-3; Dance 
Committees; Lab assistant: 1; Honor 
Group; Pilgrim Staff. 




jroup; rilgrim btaft. 
DENNIS ANTHONY, F 



ANTHONY FURTADO 




, Den, 



UR1 



: 



DENNI 

"Love, too!' 

Den" — seen with Horn, Den, Pine and the 
boys — likes girls but not homelessons — 

ijants I1jb travel — secretly desires to own 
a Cadillac — study f and i Mrs. Kingman — 
seen in a hot Ford — , works at the First 
National — bound for those Navy blue's — 
our most entertaining guy — always good 
for a laugh. Mi/' \5 

Activities: Cross Country: 1; Dance Com- 
mittees. 



GERALD FURTADO 



"Oh, no!" 



"Lerd" — English scholar — cheezeburgers — 
seen at the "North Plymouth Bowling Al- 
leys" — rides around in a '55 Plymouth — 
a certain sophomore girl — dislikes algebra 

— after P.H.S.: work! — with Dave and 
Bette — Teves — a certain locker at recess 

— oh! to be successful — sleepy eyed dream- 
er — nice ties and sports jackets. 





Our star bucket 




They're up to something! 




What's wrong with loafing? 




The season's over 



23 







^jj! 






V 




v^^p 


p^ 








RITA ANNE GIACCAGLIA 

"Don't get all shook!" 

"Reet" — she's off to N. C. — oh! to make 
R. R. happy — a cute little wife — what 
would the First National do without her? — 
dislikes the U.S.M.C. and days without mail 
— seen with Carol, Marie, and Arlene — is 
leaving escalators to P.H.S. — that husky 
voice — in a hurry — Bob. 

Activities: S.A.S.: 1. 



CLAIRE ANN GOVONI 

"Not too bright" 

"Blondie" — seen with Syl and Choo-Choo 
— makes a cute secretary for Malaguti Bro- 
thers — lives strictly for Dick and Italian 
cooking — that blue Olds — "Dick's coming 
up" — seen at all the games — likes all 
kinds of music — longs to go to California. 

Activities: Dance Committees; Office Assist- 
ant: 3; Class Colors Committee; Drama- 
tic Club: 1; Basketball: 1. 



J 



JANICE MARIE GRENNELL- 

"Jan" — seen driving Joey'to school — Rosie, 
Ginnie," Effie, Diane and Pat — picture her 
riding in a jeep — a handy little book- 
keeper — a' Mr. Holmes, fan — wants a new 
Ford — employed at the' Coca Cola Bottling 
Company — in favor of a shorter school 
year and mqre vacations — 'tha^ ( crazy blue 
car. VJ » 

Activities: Office Assistant: 3| 



ARLENE ROSE GUIDABONI 

"You're gonna get it" 

"Squid" — one of the "Van Twinkles" — al- 
ways talking — seen with Barb — picture 
her a beautician — to do away with home 
lessons and younger brothers — to be with 
a certain someone — what would she do 
without Tassy's? — third period study — 
can't wait to graduate. 

Activities: Dance Committees. 




Just relaxing 




I'm not for sale!! 



24 





K 






MORTON G 

'You might know!" 

"Nan" — it's only 

ing in the gynV during 



spend money and talk o 



/ 

Id lik 

ies — /iov|es/tc 
e»Jrjh<me — 'mans 
to enter college — GailV' cellar and Tassy's 
— secret desire: to tape Joe — rock'n roll 
and WINsV^-flislikqs (Conceited boys. 

Activities: \Bank 
Group; Dance 




AUSTIN OSBOURNE HARDING JR. 

"Done your English?" 

"Aus" — seen at Gellar's with Art and John 
— likes physics and Mrs. Urann — to be an 
electronics expert — takes many radios apart 
in his spare time — hates the race to the 
cafeteria from the third floor — likes coffee 
and doughnuts — drives a truck in "God's 
Country" — Navy — all for longer lunch 
hours. 



Stalling for time 



GERALD IRWIN HARPER JR. 

"Hey, Biz" 

"Hap" — those sophomore girls — pet peeve: 
chocolate ice cream — French III — wants 
to travel anywhere — secret desire: play the 
drums — an S.A.S. worker — move the sophs 
up with the seniors — Biz and Frankie — 
attend college — Honor Society V. P. — at 
the bowling alleys — office assistant — "Ma" 
fan. 

Activities: Honor Society Vice-President; 
Honor Group; Cross Country: 1; Bas- 
ketball: 1; S.A.S.: 1-2-3; Fund Collector: 
1-2-3; Dance Committees. 



MARGUERITE ANN HASZ 

"Hi" 

"Maggie" — destination: University of Chi- 
cago — loves to read books — dislikes long 
homelessons — to have a coke machine in 
P.H.S. — Mrs. Urann's English class — life 
among the volumes at the North Plymouth 
Library — loves math — desires to fly an 
airplane — always ready to help — writes for 
the paper — teasing Allan. 
Activities: Honor Society Secretary; Honor 
Group; Dance Committees; Sunsetters 
1-2; Press Club: 2-3; Latin Club: 2-3 
Class Motto Committee; Pilgrim Staff 
Glee Club: 1-2. 




Secret weapon 





OEM COLL^NS^S HAl 
d6n't^ou -musp alon^ ho 

jerkj £& Copj^fsV- Upves 

$ t ad l s — sfe V ^fe h ^ 

iiikes^eOTny g*lsjipdvP. C. 

n and Mr. 1 Holmes — Eng- 

^oopm/'s Wfr in New Bed- 

i r^cK girlV4- wants to get out 

jukebox in P.H.S. 



25 




w 









HERRIES 




ARLENE MA 

know" 

'Mala" — Jordan Hospital worker — math 
and Miss Locklin — likes movies, TV and a 
certain baker — can't stand long homeles- 
sons — seen at the movies — wants to spend 
a day with Marlon Brando — seen with P. C, 
Margie, Mary Phyl and Jean — going, to 
Burbank Hospital to become a nurse — a 
swimming pool in P.H.S. 
Activities: Dramatic Club: 1; Basketball: 1- 
2; Latin Club: 1-2-3; Class Motto Com- 
mittee; Graduation Chairman; Dance 
Committees; Honor Group; Ticket Sell- 



er. 



bf 



HELEN MAY HOLMAN 

"Dad, can I have the Chevie?" 

"Hel" — seen with Bev, Nancy, and Diane 

— Grant's best salesgirl — plans to enter the 
field of art — likes Mrs. Raymond — cheer- 
ing at the games — lives for roller skating 

— found at Tassy's enjoying her favorite 
pastime: eating — those crazy Bermuda 
shorts and argyle knee socks — proud of 
her driver's license. 

Activities: Dance Committees; Class Colors 
Committee; Class Gift Committee. 



ROLLENE JOAN HOLMES 



"O hum" 




ooking for^-~a«anillionaire — 

n the schprj^ bus — seen 

and |3To — Uncle Sam? here she 

"~cqjjdju and drinking 

vBt^toyNotjtJi Africa — 

Kiiigfldan — » In the Pil- 

defimtely needs more 



"Roll; 

■4okes ^5. wants 
JiojrW J a ( ks 

Dru£? 
>y «ri 

Activities: Dance Committees. 



PflpfqyMfilPfl 




KiK'fsirtts iiwm 


HE;,, j^^^m ^^B 


£fP 


H 


"*SHcs 


i^^^pn^K* 




a.L T 



Real gone "jerk" 



Hi- \ v 






«_4 ■ < 



I lost another five 




■ 



Penny for your thoughts 



26 



• 







«r 






)■$ 




• 



JOSEPHINE HELEN HORNER 

"Big job" 

"Jo" — works at the Jordan Hospital — seen 
with Alice, Dot, and Hank — wants to be a 
secretary but plans to get married — Hank 
is her desire — likes bowling and the Air 
Force — dislikes blushing — a fan -of Mrs. 
Gardner — look for her in -Jim's — on those 
study periods — wants TV in all the class- 
rooms — she's engaged! 



JOSEPH VINCENT HORTON 

"No-OO!" 

"Jay" — destination: U. S. Air Force — Mrs. 
Urann and English — a certain sophomore 
girl — oh, to make a million dollars — Lor- 
etta, Pete, the boys — First National handy- 
man — dislikes homelessons — seen on Brad- 
ford St. — loves radio — North Plymouth 
inhabitant — crazy about his boss — a cer- 
tain nook in the senior corridor. 

Activities: 10(*-a-week Collector; Football: 
1; Dramatic Club: 1. 




-Give 
"Bill" 



L* 



WILLIAM NELSON HORTON 



/ 




ive me odds" 

"Bill" — destination: William and Mary ■ 
would like to change Plymouth into a New 
England Williamsburg — dislikes "those 
Dodgers" — loves people — English with 
Mrs. Urann — seen soliciting ads for the 
Pilgrim — our veep — Tammy and Jim — 
loves politics — to do something unusual — 
interested in that green stuff — argues with 
Claire. ' 

Activities: Pilgrim Business Manager; Dance 
Committees; Senior Class Vice-Presi- 
dent; Game Helper. 



MARY LOU JULIANI 

"That's the kind of kid I am" 

"Lou" — shorthand and Mrs. Urann — goes 
for males in general, and they go for her 

— seen with Don — hates worms and liver 

— picture her with nine boys by 1970 — 
wants a French poodle — writes letters in 
spare time — destined to be a secretary for 
Rock Hudson — is going to send us her first 
million for a new school. 




So, what'll I do now? 




I**- 



What a racket 





Spirit of the class! 



<ffl 






27 



\ 



^ 



1 







<5 




QtavertiftfleM- cmte and Ufo shy -ti- 
r plW — .White) Klalnd pond -fpsuJe /| 
nploBjed at/VSmitjij^- majAiage/ls I. if 

WW 





1 

J;: 


' 


■a 


1 


i 




1 





and '^d^ncing^ wrahts to own a^ 
dble^^een a^J^Jgp/Sjsl^S^o^r^ 
liz at ?w7og^lrk£s •'art— "Miss Kelly—J 
J^coke^acbine io^p# 

Activities: Librarian; Pilgrim Staff. (j 



BERNADETTE MARY L 




"Oh, nuts!7 

'Berrye^^restfe^'clf fcft^Tayernelli's fan' 1 
club — /petf peeves: Dqyon, /spvfa,/dndJ $orto: 
— oh, those ^i«tit^Vaia3^ei^ warns' to 
a mjiifeeAy HsteMffltd /WPLMp- 4$/ with /rue 
girls! Jari^ wa^frf ^(wjtl/H^f»ara MJ^-to 
spepd 24! jhowesi ^pxh K^TlmVi^rando -ft- travel 
to Hawaii^and R/whe -j^eve^/Mad — that 
interesXing/rfoteboQ'k. i/jv / hy 

Activities: Honor Group; Ticket Seller; La- 
tin Club: 2-3; Dance Committees; Pil- 
grim Staff. 




ELSIE ROSE LEDO 



n 



^inda, Mid the 



"Oh, gee" #/[/' 

J^JlieT^- seeh /wlt> 
"girls — is de-nnit[ely y( f^qr/pf^a^olishing 
hQm/e&ssons^t jb.$rfC-p& fa^ofMfi King- 
(. man -M& 6e a' tether/- att/Otre movies or 
irummt of i jpPVset — ( pjzza and spaghetti 
— ambition: marriage — swell personality — 
always ready to go somewhere. 



Does he bite? 




The locker's stacked!! 



BfsiF 'air m 




■ 



Let me comb my hair first 






VIRGINIA ANN LOVEJOY 

"Oh, no!" 

"Lovey" — eating — a great typist — Mrs. 
Whiting's assistant — at Tassy's — a Mr. 
Holmes fan — what's Germany got? — the 
quiet type — will make somebody a cute 
secretary — with Rose and Jan — P.H.S. 
should have more study periods — cool, 
calm, and collected — her pastime is baby 
sitting — always kidding Mr. Smiley — 
writes letters. 

Activities: Office Assistant: 2-3; Bank Teller. 




JAMES A 



'Gd&<£\shc 



"J4mn\J(\*-^:ngJ»s 
hangs out ir 




UR MARSH 



.arid Mr.. rJkolmea — 
t in "(^(^slJPountr^'i+^^anoineB—r 
loyes psych^r tid\ ql* an|pUie^/ / Herbert/ Purl- 
brMt — \seenK>vim "Tmi/' Hans -A^pasket- 
baijlWiza,i^lA- always taUclng of future spac9 
travel^- \jBhb, BU^and Jack-M/loves Ma 
orfjei * in thfe summer — his\j freckles^ ^ 
ways taUojig —real . tfyrendly -*- pr,j 
member \ff30Z -AJanpyy 

Activities: Baskftfeall: 1-2-3; 
Dance Committees. 







PATRICIA ANN MCGUINNESS 

"Oh, great!" 

"Pat" — shorthand — she came from Silver 
Lake — tall and willowy — roller skating 
and pizza fan — likes "Ma Urann" — seen at 
the drive-in — would like to interior deco- 
rate Marlon Brando's home — bowling and 
sports — Margie and Jackie — destined to 
be some lucky guy's secretary — boys and 
more boys — fellow homework hater. 






I like money 






^^J 


I 




^52 / 






• 






M 




m ■ 




±_ . m 


' 


^^ ** -^^ 


^^. V V- ^ 



Someone has a black eye! 




She came from Silver Lake 



29 






STEPHEN ARTHUR MCNARY 

"Hey, Jim" 

"Steve" — likes television but really can't 
stand homelessons — favorite subject is 
radio — seen with Pete, Bill, and Jim at 
Gellar's Service Station — after graduation 
Uncle Sam's going to get him — would like 
to have gym two periods a week at P.H.S. 
— knows how to get along with women — 
so nice looking. 



iaS^M- 



i 



BARBARA ANN MIDRIFF, yV^C 



-t 



"Let's, go" hJ^ 

"Babs" — seen holding a telephone — boys!! 
— destined to marry a millionaire and go \q^c/i 
Hawaii — hates cats and bad manners — 
Mrs. Kingman — future stir line hostess — 
wants to stop homelessons — Tassy's, , here 
I come!" — Arlene, Fran, and ^Bfernie — 
pretty hair — her sister >— jusi Java, i 

Activities: Dance* Committees; Class Colors 



Committee; Dramatic 



Class 
Club: 1. 



ROBERT EDWARD MISKELLY 

"Aw nuts!" 

"Bob" — a wonderful guy — usually with 
Bill and Jim — loves sports — hates the 
Yankees — De Molay — Mr. President — an 
S.A.S. worker — headed for college — Ice- 
land's — seen in a Pilgrim uniform — pic- 
ture him a grandfather! — Oh, that trig!" — 
Marshf ield — shoulder block — so much fun 
— nice dresser — Silver Lake. 
Activities: Senior Class President; S.A.S. : 
1-2-3; Fund Collector: 1-2-3; Pilgrim 
Staff: 1-2-3; Cross Country: 1-2-3; Dance 
Committees; Honor Society; Game 
Helper. 



JACQUELINE FRANCES MOORE 




"It don't imatt 



y 



J_WgJ.«« +« KnflXmU /n 




"Bubbles" 4-)Waips to .becbm&/a mod„ 
hatq3lbossjr popple ^frcpgettirig home)Learly 
AAithrives onp rock^a^d lN ro|l / — FWi(ja, hepe 
' she c/arnes' — sgeny^going totford jJCarye/ — 
dri'^r trfflmhfe §«d , jfcfr\ Simile/— SHirley, 
Bev, JSR^ay^jSlasketbal]/— hW^edv -nor the 
air -j-yWid&i /6utiA>44 — WINS; All?n Freed 

Activities': Dance Committees. 



It's later than you think 




I dig the work 



30 





CLAIRE DOROTHY MOREY 

"Wanna bet!" 

"Clay" — seen with Carole — almost ready 
to retire and wait for Marlon — goes for 
broad shoulders and crew cuts — a fan of 
Mrs. Urann's — a "Van Twinkle" — seen at 
the Royal Palm Do-Nut Shop and First 
National Store — picture her an Old Spice 
saleswoman — demands shorter corridors — 
a hot Ford. 

Activities: Ticket Seller; Dance Commit- 
tees; Bank Teller. 



JOSEPH COPELAND MORSE 

"Hey, Effie" 

"Joey" — another of Mr. Guidoboni's boys — 
seen with a gun or a fishing rod — those 
Manomet boys — hates the rush to the cafe- 
teria from 303 when "Ma" keeps the class 
until 11:30 — the outdoor type — a Manomet 
garbageman — would like to put a V8 in a 
jeep — seen at Churchill's — headed for the 
Maritime Academy. 

Activities: Radio Club. 



ROBERT ALLEN MORSE 



"What" 



"Bob" — at Jan's house — hates homework 
— Stan and Ronny — super electrician — 
Hatch Electric Company — pizza and choc- 
olate ice cream — quiet and shy? — do away 
with English at P.H.S. — great guy when 
it comes to friendship — just one gal for 
him — handsome — his cute little car. 



- PATRICIA ANN MURPHY 



\) 



r 



"You brat" 

"Pat" — likes stenography and Mr. Romano 
— . seen with Di, Effie, and Rosie — at Tas- 
sy's — doesn't like bookkeeping — some day 
soon, Tab ' Hunter's secretary — types in 
spare time — plans to become a secretary — 
would abolish homelessons at*' P.H.S. if only 
she could — '■ much too shy — her sister, Jane 
— those blue eyes. 

Activities: Game Helper. 




Well 


•known BOSS! 




MCl. 




»* i^ - p^^ 




1 ■* ^Bk. 


r ^js 


w mm ' 




M- ""*** 



What a spread! 



ljhi 




Junior executive 




Mood music 




31 








-Nw 



DAVID ARNOLD NUNES 

"Wow!" 

"Smittie" — Jim, Pete and the boys — loves 
sports — tall and handsome — auto mech 
and Mr. Guidoboni — seen in Cooper's — 
headed for the Navy — would like teachers 
like Ma Urann — smooth dancer — a con- 
firmed bachelor — one of our great basket- 
ball team — to be a state cop — psych — 
belongs to the "Broken Nose Club" — Naval 
Reserve. 

Activities: Basketball:l-2-3; Dance Commit- 
tees. 



SYLVIA INES OSBORNE 

"What a riot!" 

"Syl" — hates catching that early bus — 
headed for art school — always chating with 
Choo-Choc and Claire — Duxbury fan — one 
track mind — dislikes climbing stairs and 
carrying books — her two brothers — those 
natural curls — Driver's Training — "Dream- 
ers Holiday" — another pizza fan — one of 
Ma's "Chillun" — talks so fast! 

Activities: Dance Committees; Pilgrim. 



fdk 




h't f&oK-Mu... 

"Eyeballs" — /se^n wfth/ZFrankie, Bob, and 
R^phy j— leJfner driving^ Zan's oar or work- 
JtiJ^ng atpCooper's — girls^ e^ecrally blondes 
er redUeads) — wo^kf make a cham- 
pion slae^er — a fan/ of Miss Kelly — would 
likal/all /study periods — sings like Eddie 
^Fisher — most flirtatious — good looking — 



/Y 



drives the girls crazy with "Domani." 
Activities: Ticket Seller. 



>TH¥ JEAN PARKER 



t-7 



"Don't/j^TgueC' with)[mer W* 

^'i?oT' -^thbse Jffew B<^or<|UBp"ys — dislikes 
'' r sisters^and 7 N[ , boysj' /pfat^ ^ase -fJFrates — pic- 
uifee herJMEhe se,e™Wyf / to a millionaire — 
Ah, WVaiHflj^igm^- Annmarie, June, Jo, 
and^Marx JLou^rock'n rdli — "Let's go to 
NeWi Befctionp -y abshsh -riomework — steno- 
graphy — vmttyy bw&Z&yjps — wants to grad- 

Act/vities: Bank Teller; Ticket Seller; Sun- 
setters: 1-2. 




Come on, Dave, hoop it 




The microphone melted 




Nice homework 



32 





JOYCE ANN PARKER 

"Honestly!" 

"No nickname" — wants Mr. Holmes for the 
next Principal — loves typing — seen with 
Gail and Marie — a red Ford — pizza and 
boys! — "dines" at Tassy's — headed for air 
training school — wants to move to Cali- 
fornia — to be an airline stewardess — dis- 
likes wise boys and homework — just dance 
and eat — those big brown eyes! 

Activities: Honor Group; Cheerleader: 2-3. 



PETER EDWARD PARKHURST 

"Hey, Boss" 

"Poetic" — home arts — picture him cooking 
a meal — with Paul, Nicoli, and Woody — 
future mechanic — a fan of Mr. Guidoboni 
— pet peeve: crew cuts and white bucks — 
oh, those purple shirts — you can always 
hear him coming — works? at Holmes Gro- 
cery — to own a motorcycle — he's Navy 
bound. 

Activities: Football: 1-2; Band. 



ALLAN , PETER PA 

r ) dorft lAiSiNr \ 

jt^X will^ y rn)a(ke^/fa top sbWntist — Mr. 
ackard aWd pHysftpd*M lbyespto /read, write, 
7 and thijJc' — futurev| JMIJ^T- student — des- 
tination: al spot onfsmoiher planet — always 
working — Jim ana Pete — his laugh is too 
seldom heard — to beat Pete at "21" — brain 
— Latin IV pupil — most intelligent — learn- 
ing to dance. 

Activities: Honor Society; Honor Group; 
Ticket Seller; Engineers' Council. 







p 







ANNMARIE PICKLES 

bw, really" 

"Gabby" — Paul, pop records, and bowling 
rV^with June, Dot and Brenda — pet peeve: 
hj) ^being too young — a "Ma" fan — marriage 
to that certain someone — Dill's hot Plym- 
outh — business economics — a home in 
California — Annie! — frequent trips to New 
Bedford — always thinking up ways to get 
the car — psych notes? 

Activities: Bank Teller; Lab Assistant: 1. 




Singing the blues 




fl" 



The motherly type 



w 



'ST.-K, V 



^m 




fSfch *** 


1 




MlmM, 


H \ 





GERALD JOSEPH PIMENTAL 

"What are you, bungy?" 
"Jerry" — future coach at P.H.S. — seen 
with Franny — President of the Mickey 
Mouse Club — Miss Johnson's pet peeve — 
helping Mrs. Whiting — chic dresser — the 
car with no back seat — one of the Hogan 
boys — never without a laugh — happy 
bachelor — sparkling brown eyes — would 
like to play 4 quarters in a game. 
Activities: lOtf-a-week Collecter; Football: 
1-2; Junior Class Treasurer; Senior 
Class Treasurer; Basketball: 1-2-3; Base- 
ball: 1-2-3; Dance Committees; Class I 
Gift Committee. 





"""•• n.> 




> i 

DA LOUISE piopwJ 

' if'BrMjC' — /seen drivingT ^[/yellow Chevl 
(CYjO secretary — always at the movies — 
Jukes cute boys — her secret love — works 
in Dad's office — LaSalle, here she comes! — 
easy going personality — dislikes getting up 
so early — Sandy and Ruby — little brother 
— father knows best — the Italian food — 
some lucky guy's private secretary. 

Activities: lOtf-a-week Collector; Ticket 
Seller; Dance Committees; Dramatic 
Club: 1; Class Colors Committee; Pil- 
grim. 



33 




Things are well in hand 




PETER HODGE PRINDLE 



and Miss Locklin — 
gexjof Weyerhauser — 
apjni/— seen with Bob, 
_'S — /wUnts to take a trip 
Id— /shV handsome redhead 
term/paper?" — at Leland's — 
Syracuse University — loves 
Irving — gets up at 4 a.m. to go hunting. 

Activities: Honor Group. 




L 



A i if \ 



\ 



incing 



JUDITH CLAIRE REMICK 

"I got a letter yesterday!" 
"Judie" — working iA Curriers — dancing 
and hamburgers, plain — Bridgewater State . 
Teachers College — ih favor of Saturday 
night dances — pet peeves: fussy customers 
and fast drivers — knitting argyles: size 11 

— S.A.S. worker — that Christmas poem — 
driving Petie crazy — "Bushy" — good cook 

— sharp dresser — Van Twinkles — "Anchors' 
Aweigh" — plays for the Glee Club. 
Activities: Dramatic Club: 1; S.A.S.: 2-3; 

Dance Committees; Basketball: 1; Ten- 
nis: 1; Fund Collector: 2-3; Drum Ma- 
jor: 2-3; Pilgrim. 




Bad night last night 




Ready made family 



34 




••» - 







GEORGIANNA RIELLY 

"Where's Joan?" 

"George" — a true sports' fan — her pretty 
sweaters and skirts — is it Plymouth or 
New York? — where does she find the time 
to be absent — a certain rather crowded 
locker — Irish? — with the North Plymouth 
girls — Carol and Pat — her laugh's conta- 
gious — a tomboy at heart — Mr. Romano 
— that ride with Jane! 



PETBR 

"You know that? 




JOHN ROMANO 



ANO , 

jj - dp-' 

"Smoky" — football a*rd those cheerleaders, 
(elpWially 6ne — to play quarterback for 
Notre Dame — favorite teacher: Mr. Ro- 
mano (no choice},,-— headed for ^college — 
ambition: engineer — Clyde, Rusa, Dickie, 
Alan — Pet peeve: try to catch one of 
Brtfii's pesses that is nowhere near him — 
let's have* a pdke machine in th,e boys' lock- 
er room — Honor\ Society pj>esident — a 
great -[guy — now, what did I do, Claire? 
Activities: Football: 1-2-3; Baseball: -1-2-3; 
Basketball: 1-2^5; Honor Group; Honor 
Society President; Engineers'. Council; 
Band; Orchestra; Class Gift Commit- 
tee; Dance Committees. 




One of our stars 




Got theater 

-witn jA.rlend— wdiild love to 

e Carole — tpljown a Ted convert 

lurfcih J time and hvlr. Holmes fan — taste 

for\je5ry sticks and rpilk ^"either listening 

.' toMviNS 'Jft w^^g^tf^ Woolworth's — rio 

MMing witrr .RoyalJKFalmty Do-nup's — $Jans 

to 7le,aV*-4n vtaJvm Pizza maJreV X& the 

Activities: Ticket Seller; Dance ' Commit- 
tees; Pilgrim Staff. 



UPRECHT 





bank presi- 
Cingman — 
JQftf/^Chevie — dhates A§riobs/— seen with 
^argie — wouldn't dhange I\h/s. in the 
least — drawings v^nd walking — visit the 
home of aunovie star — picture her out of 
school —Chappy and carefree — at the mov- 
ies -=- liked driver training. 




Perish the thought 



^ 



\ 





MAR^ PHYJLLIS 

- 



. 



J^ 



jM 



35 



RYAN 



"You know what happened \ast nigHt^" • 

'Mary Thyl" -7- hostess at Samoset House — 
a magician's assistant — likes hockey — 
basketball and Danny — seen with P.C., Jo, 
and Margie — at Gambini's — Miss Knight 
and physical education — plans t6 ' s.tudy 
entomology at the University of Mass. — 
"Off We G<5 into^ the Wild Blue Yonder" — 
seen with a camera in hand. 

Actiyities: *• Basketball: 1-2-3; Hockey: 2*3; 
Dance Committees; Pilgrim Staff; Game 
Helper; Class Motto Committee Chair- 
man. 



JEROME RICHARD SANTOS 

"Hi, doll" 

"Jerry" — a state trooper — he and Bernie 

— girls, sports, and R & B music — pet 
peeve: girls that go steady — secret desire: 
play quarterback for U.C.L.A. — would like 
to have Marilyn Monroe teach home arts — 
likes to snooze — our one touchdown hero 

— "Don't push" — he's bashful? — always 
with a smile — S.A.S. worker. 

Activities: Football: 1-2-3, co-captain: 3; 10(f- 
a-week Collector; Baseball: 1-2-3; S.A.S.: 
3; Dance Committees; Class Motto Com- 
mittee. 

y JR]jki MAJti SCxjTTO 

V "No*m"-/<alJ<,/ftalk, ' t#kv« always 

everybody — another ^nLlHolrAe's fan — or 

to ibe^a hfct/rod driver -7-^wojuld like to rjtit 

jort abfllut 50 mujates,/^ pelf peeve: 

lesUh^d ho lvtre j W'side of 

pim'sA-Foyx coiverlijoles — 

fos kerj^6odl^( haircut, that is!) 

taHSg/ /®ver h / e/\ pfrc-olems with Mary — 

n Twir 




witl 



h 



Activities 





ommittees; Pilgrim, 



l}J MARIE \CBC*LE ySERrf^ 

"V Is, ■ IT . 



war*' all Y£ar 
liohoife -^pictu| 
— cute cneerle? 
Ay gfHs — h\er/ 
interests li^in 



inKler — headed where it's 
ound — wants to be a mil- 
er 4 little French artist 
r — to'^ do away with cat- 



velf— a fan of Ma Urann — 

fijaxbury* — likes a certain 
t drives it — last summer 
~ aV Hilltdp^ — a , junior. J 1 J 

"ctivjt/es: stjA.'$. Secretary} S^S.A.S.: 1-2-3; 
10<i-a-<week Collector: 1^2-3; Fund Col- 
lectoij: V 2 * 3 ; Cheerleader: 2-3:' Co- 
cWtain: /3: Dance Committees; Pilgrim. 




Our captain 




■ 



■ 






Cooling off? 



36 






ALLAN PUTNAM SHERMAN 

"It really is, isn't it?" 

"Al" — Mr. Packard and all the sciences — 
arguing with Mr. Wilson — with Charlie, 
Don, Allan, and Dennis — pet peeve: slip- 
pery roads — flying model airplanes — 
sleeping late at square dancing — buy a 
new typewriter for Mr. Wilson — future 
engineer — seen picking cranberries — that 
drag with Pop after our dance — rather in- 
telligent. 

Activities: Dance Committees; Pilgrim: 1-2- 
3; Sunsetters: 1-2-3; Game Helper; Hon- 
or Group; Engineers Council. 



DENNIS PAUL SILVA 

"Frigid, man" 

"Cat" — seen everywhere — likes "Experi- 
ence" — Latin IV — likes girls and food 

— seen with Nails and Doug, — to be 
a top engineer — digs progressive jazz — 
works at Dexter's — hates pizza and com- 
positions — smooth dancer with his sister 

— which twin has the Toni? — secret desire: 
own a complete collection of jazz records. 

Activities: Band; Orchestra. 



DIANE PAULA SILVA 

"Eee Gad" 

"Di" — a certain friend with a crew cut 
and a bruised nose — wants to see the world 
— with Choo-Choo and Elissa — hates shy 
boys and tomatoes — to build bigger win- 
dows in P.H.S. — wants more teachers like 
Mr. Holmes — picture her playing at Car- 
negie Hall — beautiful hair — Friday night 
movies. 

Activities: Basketball: 1; Glee Club 





RiD SUMMONS 



and his radio — 
rj&er •Q-.&rench fries in sand 
the j^ovies — with Bob, Bill, 
r\atfei Sher}rd-rpet \j?ejeve: fa^t gijls iri7 Ber- 
muda shorts^-^ chewing gum — ambition: 
college — wa^ts\VPLM in ] 'the "b/gn^-sphool 
radio room — |4bves\ EnglisW-4( n y VMiF type- 

Activities^ Sunsetters: 2-3; 
Band: Radio Club. 



Staff; 






Hot trumpet 




h 


klf 


1 


r II sL*~a 




JfM-a 



Hmm! Hmmmm! 




Alpha, baker, charlie 






W'ti 






37 




WILLIAM BARTLETT SLOAN 



"You're kidding 

bound for 
Denn 





ty 



c 



"Djdkle" — iKngliSB/ and Mrs. Raymond — to 



,_ ^and M 
i njarry (jMariliyn- Moniioe — pet likes; S. W 



Rty PETEIJ, jiSOMMI 



<> pliz 



pitza, vacations — ^t: dislikes: . S. W^s j(pm 



listening to R. 
jy.^Chick, and 
.JicltfT^'seen working at A & I* — picture 
him/ the father of five kids! 



hfoyfrienfls' andflirhion soup v - 
Ay " — M^ss. ScrjjpWl of Barbery - 




d,Mambo music — Be 



\ 



x 




•9% W** W •. 



DIANE STURTEVANT 

and talking on the 
— >Bm1 — wants to 
,nd the bar in 
s snob**— President of the 
ss *ft.elly — eating pizzas — 
elessons — oh, those hair- 
three musketeers: Nancy, 

Activities: Librarian; Dance Committees. 



nPlWAME^ STEMEN SWANTON 

£\^>^ <\ s\ ^XA 

g x thing* don^jon 
d\Jo 
Snd Miss Ld^lilin^P^I}.$.'.sh 
conditipriSJgi^- oh* 

liJcBfvtft/give \Wiss 
nch . soQfets-r— ^Wyitl 



an/ cc 

tra 





seeve:, 

^-DranfatjcClub: 1; 
, 9an«(SVeor 
5; j^m/setters:[l; 

1 & 





Wall support 





Look at the birdie! 




Nose dive 




He's packing 



38 




WARREN SYLVIA 

ou late*/ Alligator" 

igator"w"8reads getting up in the morn- 
likes Miss Kelly — seen at the Boys' 
lub and Scag's — wants a Chevie with a 
1 in it — home arts — headed for the Navy 
— big flirt — slaves at the Central Shoe Re- 
pair Shop — very friendly — Clem, Roy, 
Bill, and Bones — sports fan — "Curly" — 
hates hard work. 





VIRGINIA SYLVIA 

y\ 

s. Kingman and home arts — 
ambition:'" i&> c-hew gum \ all day in school 
without getting caught >— ^babysitting — Em- 
^jlyf- — witii, Maggie — listen \to WPLM — eat, 
, sleep; and be/ mer^ y^^ always in the movies 
J — dying to get av&ay from Plymouth — mar- 
riage, is her destination — stop all books 
from leaving P.H.S. 




He flies through the air 




Now Class 




DAVID TAVARES 

"How do I know?" 

"Leaky" — would like to win a contest for 
having the biggest muscles — home arts and 
Mrs. Kingman — hates winter — seen play- 
ing pool and bowling at the "North Plym- 
outh Bowling Alleys" — basketball star — 
Uncle Sam's going to get him — Jackie — 
pinboy at the Alleys — would like to have 
more subjects to choose from in P.H.S. — 
with "Lerd." 



Activities: Dance Committeesj 
2-3. 




sketball: 



TEFHjEN 

(foolish'V 

a «erta(iik junior / girlt^— Navy 

secrelMdesirej to arrtest Ij. Z. for 

— who lives at OvVlpoW Terrace? 

arts -+- eating spaghetti/ and steak 

h ho/nelessons — buyA/Mr. Guido- 

new/Hruck — a fan of Miss Kelly's 

— jB.A.S. Mvorker — out wijth Judy — our 

ndsojfoest boy — smart sport's jackets — 

ienfljy toward all. 

'vAgflvities: 10<!-a-week Collector; Dance 
/ /Committees: Sophomore Class President; 
/S.A.S.: 3. 





Future housewife 



39 














M 



eWr m 



■^RAnIcES, &VELYNV TIBBETTS 





■'. -You b«ter Mieve « 

"Frafa" -4 seero- in ai /red convertible^ — hopes 
to see rjew 7 Yorjki-W a certain lqqker at re- 
cess — Barb and! Arlene — another "Van 
Twirikle" — iMefe bookkeeping*— black * cof- 
fee' at Tas&y^s ^always has-' something to 
do — 'dev^tfes (her time to pave A- ""rasa!" — 
future beautician — k^e^s operat$r$J busy — 



cq^qperativiC t 

Activities: Bank Teller; Dance Committees. 

r 



CLAIRE MARIE VANCINI 

"Can I have the car?" 

"Ceece" — Jo, Judy, and San — a one way 
ticket to the moon for Bill Horton! — knits 
argyles and sweaters for her brothers — 
headed for nursing school — what's Tara 
got? — ■ Pilgrim editor — that sophomore year 
— an interest in B. C. — hopes to find a hus- 
band by 1990 — oh, that Mr. Snyder. 
Activities: Pilgrim Assistant Editor: 2-3; 
Pilgrim Editor: 3; S.A.S.: 1-2-3; Latin 
Club: 1-2: Secretary: 1; Basketball 1-2; 
Tennis: 1-2-3; Fund Collector: 1-2-3; 
Honor Group; Honor Society; Drum 
Major: 1-2-3; Sophomore Class Secre- 
tary, Best Girl Citizen — Class Gift 
Committee; Dramatic Club: 1; Debating 
Club: 1. 



VIRGINIA JOYCE VIEIRA 

"What I mean!" 

"Ginny" — freehand drawing — with Carole 
and Diane — a fan of Mrs. Brown — her 
weaknesses: boys and clothes — Joe — de- 
sires to go to Hollywood — would like to 
remodel P.H.S. — one of the North Plym- 
outh gals — real friendly — good things 
come in small packages — beautiful hair — 
listens to WLYN. 

Activities: Dance Committees. 



VIERA 




J if 
CAROLE ANTOINETTE 

"Isn't that tremendous?" 

\ I 
"Cackle" — a}ways with Claire — would make 

a good $iodel — goes for six footers — would 
like to leave higher ceilings to P.H.S. — a 
fan of-Mr. Holmes — Marlon — a Van Twink- 
ler — either, at Royal Palm Do-Nut-Shop or 
Shwom Brothers — likes study — to dream 
of retiring — lots of fun — to be with Bob- 
by in California. 

Activities: Dance Committees; Ticket Sell- 
er; Pilgrim Staff. 




"Plymouth High School" 

■■■■ 




'I'll get the stick" 




How's the water? 



■ 



'/> 



40 









MARY LOUISE WAITT 

"Don't call me Shorty!" 

"Half-Pint" — Marlon Brando's wife — Bill's 
private secretary — to be just five feet — 
always smiling — what's Iowa got that 
Plymouth hasn't? — argues with Mr. Holmes 
— to put elevators in P.H.S. — picture her 
the mother of quintuplets! — likes Fords — 
seen with Shorty — very competent typist. 

Activities: 10<f-a-week Collector; Ticket 
Seller; Pilgrim Staff. 



SANDRA WARD 

"How ya gettin' home?" 

"San" — wants to outrace D. R. without get- 
ting a ticket — hates catty girls — Claire, 
Shannon, Marie — oh, that marching in the 
snow! — to be a toe dancer — what hap- 
pened last summer? — French and Miss 
Jacques — '"I'll follow Joan!" — "number 
please" gal — an apartment in New York 
in three years — junior boys. 

Activities: Lab Assistant: 1; Dramatic Club: 
1; Dance Committees; Drum Major: 2-3; 
Pilgrim Staff. 



JOAN WHITING 

/'There's trouble" 
Jo" — envied for her beautiful hair — loves 
iwney — drives Mrs. Raymond crazy 
e changes her mind about the fu- 
that polio chart — with everybody — 
gel in disguise — all the guys' sweet- 
— writes to certain servicemen — 
ores basketball games — "bumpy feet" — 
terest in Silver Lake — club woman — 
Boy Flat Top." 
fctivities: S.A.S.: 1-2-3; S.A.S. Treasurer: 3; 
''Dramatic Club: 1; Sophomore Class 
^v^Ce-President; Junior Class Vice-Presi- 
dent; Senior Class Secretary; Basket- 
ball: 1; Basketball Manager: 3; Tennis: 
1; Fund Collector: 1-2; Polio Fund 
Chairman: 3; Dance Committees; Latin 
Club: 1-2; Pilgrim Staff: 3; Honor So- 
ciety; Honor Group; Drum Major: 1-2-3. 




ELAINE JWILU9- 



"Junie" v- good natur*d — ^Always with Ann- 
- marie — fan of ""Mjs.' ' Kingman — oh! that 
• homework, r- riding around in a ^Plymouth 

— ambition: marriage — wants b^ longer re- 
cess period at P.H.S. — can't w^it to gradu- 

n \ * n 

ate — (Jrbzy sense qj humor — seen at Tassy's 

— who's that certain someone? —talk, talk, 
talk — Gil.' ' 




w*r* 



r 



'Hillbilly" 





41 






J 




ESTHER ANNE WOOD 

"Poor Babe" 

"Woody" — seen with Sara — always writing 
letters and dreaming of Bermuda — a Miss 
Kelly fan — picture her a December bride 

— what would she do without Ronny and 
the Post Office Department — oh! to meet 
Marlon — is leaving coke machines to P.H.S. 

— seen in a yellow jeep — a redhead — 
buried in a book — potential model. 

Activities: Pilgrim Staff; Dramatic Club; 
Bank Teller; Dance Committees, f 



PAULINE IfcOU] 

know 'ttrtiat!" 




M 



\f> i/ 



OOD 



) 



pifcza — Miss^TDc 
histqrjr— that cariain someone 



Downey 

someone 

r£, Sy/r— aW to make 

/rassy'jj — VSaby sits 

oh, ttj^apoiish hoflieWork^-L aShew driver's 

icensf — fun to be with — always reads the 

notices twice — laughing all the time. 



the girls/— CI? 
apo ish hoi 




; 



Activities: Honor Group; Glee Club. 



, ROBERT WOOD 

''95 in second ,gear'y 

'•Sam" -J- always in school- on time — Pete, 
Paul,' and/Aernie— = pet peeve: girls that go 
steady — a Coach Mullen fan — at White 
Horse Beach — Chevy V8 "and playing pool 
— football and basketball — headed for the 
Army — should havfe six s^udy periods a 
day — to beat Paul at elfeht ball — those 
long lashes. 

Activities: Football: 1-2-3; Basketball: 1- 
2-3. 

dianaI^mary youngman 

"You;'revso cunn\n" Jv 

"Di" — sheV in 1^/e — to live , fon the 
French >Riviera -p\a great little artist — Elis- 

ds\ v mother's cakes rr Ma , y rann — always 
ing te,ased"-\- v p,ave\ |D|a\e, Dave — install 
a juke box in evejy class — employed at 
Grant's? — "My honey's « absent!" — "Di, can 



I haVe a cookie?" — that typing I class! 

Activities: Pilgrim Art Editor; Honor Group; 
Latin Club: 1-2; Dance Committees. 




Self portrait! 




Hidden compartment 




Sure shot 




Well, I declare 



42 





RUBY JEAN ZINANI 

"Who cares?" 

"Rube" — headed for Burdett — likes Ma 
Urann's study — spends time roller skating 
and collecting boys from 19-25 — Bren, San- 
dra, and Diane — private secretary of J. C. 
B. — seen at the Lobster Bowl — wants 
teachers like Marlon Brando — global geo- 
graphy — always smiling — would like to 
live in Manomet. 

Activities: Librarian. 



PAUL MARIO ZANOTTI 

"Never say die!" 

"Ashphault" — likes to fool around radios 
— Mr. Holmes for President! — hunting with 
Woody — those chicks at Brant Rock — Pete 
and Woody — would like a blonde with a 
baby blue Caddy — seen in Balboni's sta- 
tion wagon — playing pool with Woody — 
sure shot with a camera — roller skating at 
Marshf ield — personality plus. 

Activities: Dance Committees; Pilgrim Staff. 




Shake, rattle, and roll 




Man in the white coat 



DEPENDABILITY SERVICE LEADERSHIP 



PATRIOTISM 





Best Girl Citizen 

CLAIRE VANCINI 

Sponsored By D.A.R. 



Best Boy Citizen 

DAVID BESEGAI 

Sponsored By V.F.W. 



PLYMOUTH MARINE RAILWAYS INCORPORATED, 14 Union Street 



43 






We Say Good-Bye 



Well, here we are about to graduate. That's a strange 
thought, isn't it? It evokes so many different emotions: 
some of us are overjoyed, others sad, still others fearful. 
Which should we be? Oh, well, it's a matter of opinion. In 
any case we're leaving and we just thought we would say 
good-bye to you, P.H.S. 

Remember when we first arrived? We were a ghastly 
crew acting so grown-up when really we were immature 
and insignificant. We would sit in the auditorium and gaze 
awe-stricken up at the seniors. They looked so sophisticated 
and they were practically free! 

Well, P.H.S. , now we sit in your balcony. We stretch 
ourselves over the rail and try to make an impression on 
the sophs. But, it's a funny feeling to sit upstairs and real- 
ize that we suddenly feel very young. 

When we leave you, P.H.S., we'll remember mostly the 
little things. Often we will think about the minor happen- 
ings and they will bring a smile to our lips in the future 
years. Things like, for instance, the time one of us said 
something about his most unfavorite teacher, and "She" was 
walking right behind the poor soul. 

If you could talk, P.H.S., I am sure you could unfold a 
glorious history. Somehow, though, I don't see how any 
class could have more memories than we do. Even the water 
fountain has some. Remember how we'd try to stall off a 
test just one more minute by getting a drink? And has a 
recess ever gone by when at least one senior wasn't sprawled 
on the floor of your top corridor trying to do his homework 
for fifth period? How many times have you heard this un- 
earthly cry; "Oh no, I forget to study for that Hamlet final!" 
These things which were near tragedies at the time will 
someday bring a smile to our lips. 

So now we leave you, P.H.S., and soon you will be our 
alma mater. Perhaps not too long from now our children's 
laughter will ring and echo down these old and dear corri- 
dors, and through them, you will once again remember us. 



Goodbye, P.H.S. Wish us luck. 




-H 




ROBERT BARUFALDI 




Best Wishes from LELAND'S RESTAURANT 



44 





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Burn bofh the hope and fear 
That mark the wau,to future dai^s, 
To goals, toward u/hich we steer. 

The candle's ever dwindlinq: 
Life's full of tasks undone 
Lers make our light a beacon bright. 
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46 



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47 




iDavid Nurces 
iBrercckPioppi 
y x Joseph Morse 
b tMarjj Ryan 
5.£. Carve lo 
6.C. Currier 
J. VMing 
«.&. Simmons 
?.J. Cavicchi 
11R. Miskelly 
ttDennis Silva 
Diane Silva 
I nS. BalWi 
i o.LinaaRossi 

ff. Helen 10 vi 
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/^Sandra Ward 
I7.R. Holmes 
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Judy Remick 
Judy Barileft 
S. OsWne 
M.DiSa1valore 
L. Cappella 

vSYLVIA O&BORKlE 



48 



Being of sound mind despite three years in P.H.S., the Class of 1956 
herein disposes of sundry effects. To you this may or may not seem funny, 
but if you don't get it, 

Gfhe QUaaa 5§ttl 

We leave our appreciation to Mr. Mongan and the faculty who always 
did their utmost to lessen our ignorance and make our high school days 
more enjoyable. 

To the Class of '57, we pass down our questionable prestige as seniors, 
our souped-up hot-rods, and the best year out of the twelve. 

To the Class of '58, we bequeath an abundance of courage and deter- 
mination to carry them to their seniority. 

Bernard Andrews leaves a heavy foot on the accelerator to Norman Fortini. 
David Anti sadly leaves the senior corridor to future young lovers. 
Sandra Balboni leaves anything but Jerry. 
Arthur Bartlett leaves his sweet old "mother" to anyone who wants to get 

into an argument and lose. 
Judith Bartlett leaves her love for the mailman to girls who get that writing 

habit. 
Robert Barufaldi leaves Mrs. Brown on the verge of a nervous breakdown. 
Elissa Benassi leaves her quiet ways to noisy people. 
David Besegai leaves a beautifully initialed desk in 305 to a junior who likes 

to read. 
LeRoy Borgatti leaves an overgrown rat to someone in the senior corridor. 
Manual Cabral leaves Stang's still standing. 
Marjorie Calhoun leaves a radio so each room can have music while they 

work. 
Virginia Canning leaves all her homelessons to those who like to do them. 
Rose Cannucci leaves bookkeeping to anyone brave enough to go through 

two years of it. 
Linda Cappella leaves a lounging room to the lazy ones who never make it 

to school by eight o'clock. 
Frank Cavacco leaves a talented paint brush to Bob Torrance. 
Janice Cavicchi leaves her fabulous wardrobe to anyone who can yell 

louder than she. 
Margie Clausson leaves a second breath for Mrs. Urann's dog, Champ. 
Paula Coombs leaves oodles of water for Mr. Packard. 
Eufelia Corvelo leaves school with a big load off her mind. 
Diane Costa leaves all pigeons that fly around the school to Mr. Gault. 
Ronald Costa leaves to the entire school his latest treatise on "Ballroom 

Dancing in 10 Easy Lessons or 9 Hard Ones." 
Carol Currier leaves a good sense of humor to those who don't believe 

everything they hear. 
Marion DiSalvatore leaves an experienced lock opener to anyone who gets 

her locker. 
Paul Douglas leaves dancing in the gym to next year's Student Council. 
Richard Doyon leaves grouse to Mrs. Urann. 
Daniel Duarte leaves Miss Johnson an expert in bookkeeping. 
Marylou Enos leaves a extra cashier to help Miss Doherty take all the 

pupils' money. 
Beverly Fohrder leaves her job at the library to Miss White. 
Shannon Fountain leaves the school a taxi so the pupil's won't have to use 

all their gas doing errands for the teachers. 
Jean Fryermuth leaves one-well-used seat in trig. 



PLYMOUTH BAKERY, 20 Market Street, Plymouth 



49 



Dennis Furtado leaves a laugh and a real good joke to those who like to 

laugh. 
Frank Gardner leaves to Mr. Rogers all the points he should have scored 

during basketball season. 
Rita Giaccaglia leaves a Caddy convertible to Mr. Smiley. 
Claire Govoni leaves her beautiful figure to next year's tall blondes. 
Janice Grennell leaves her brains and experience to those who need them. 
Arlene Guidaboni leaves a year's supply of gum to Barbara Bratti. 
Nancy Gulhang leaves boys to Gail Sears. 
Austin Harding leaves on a slow boat to China. 
Gerald Harper leaves all his brainy answers in the text books. 
Marguerite Hasz leaves her goods marks to those who aren't fortunate 

enough to have brains. 
Roger Hathaway leaves Mr. Holmes a pound of grass seed for his lawn. 
Arlene Herries leaves those seventy pounds to anyone! 
Helen Holman leaves a match to Mrs. Raymond so she can burn those 

"Good English" tests. 
Rollene Holmes leaves her sweetness and shyness to those who need it. 
Josephine Horner leaves all homelessons to the teachers. 
Jay Horton leaves Loretta lonely. 

William Horton leaves his excuses to Mr. Holmes, who doesn't want them. 
Mary Lou Juliani leaves the boys in a fog. 
Helen Kivi leaves a Thunderbird school bus. 
Mary Lahey leaves a good opinion of herself to the teachers. 
Bernadette Ledo leaves her Latin books to Jean Perdigo. 
Elsie Ledo leaves a small desk to Sharon Cadman. 
Virginia Lovejoy leaves Mr. Holmes a recording of her voice. 
Barbara Maki wills her secret as to how to get along with Mr. Mullen. 
James Marsh leaves his skill with a basketball to Hans Slade. 
Stephen McNary surprisingly leaves P.H.S. still standing. 
Barbara Midkiff leaves her sister to Ronnie Soares. 
Robert Miskelly leaves his gavel to future class leaders. 
Jacqueline Moore leaves an extra book closet key to Mrs. Whiting. 
Claire Morey wills a new, improved punishment system to Mr. Pyle. 
Joseph Morse leaves those warped crutches to someone who doesn't have 

stairs to climb. 
Robert Morse leaves each day. 

Patricia Murphy leaves her shy good looks to a less fortunate one. 
David Nunes leaves weight and muscles to those wanting to make headway 

with a gal. 
Sylvia Osborne leaves her math I book to Mr. Romano. 
David Parker leaves junior girls swooning as he sings "Domani." 
Dorothy Parker leaves Mr. Smiley a nervous wreck. 
Joyce Parker leaves her pep to next year's "big 8." 
Peter Parkhurst wills his "hot car" to anyone willing to pay a buck. 
Allan Paul leaves on a hydromatic flying saucer in search of a hydrogen 

blonde. 
Annmarie Pickles leaves chewing gum stuck under her desk in study hall. 
Gerald Pimental leaves his well-dressed look to a hopeful junior. 
Brenda Pioppi wills to future seniors the privilege of climbing that extra 

flight of stairs. 
Peter Prindle leaves Hamlet to be or not to be. 
Judith Remick leaves her tiny voice to Mrs. Gardner. 
Peter Romano leaves Mrs. Urann more stray boys to bring home. 
Linda Rossi leaves to all concerned six periods of solid "Rock and Roll." 
Shirley Ruprecht wills her culinary skills to those who have trouble boiling 

water. 
Mary Phyllis Ryan wills a cow to Mrs. Urann so she can have fresh milk 

for her ulcers. 



SAMOSET HOUSE for Enjoyable Dining Out 



50 



Jerry Santos leaves the coaches wishing he wasn't. 

Norma Scotto leaves her psychology book to Mr. Wilson, who needs it 

worse than she does. 
Marie Serra leaves her curly hair to Jeannette Basler. 
Allan Sherman leaves Mr. Young the recording of "Turkey in the Straw." 
Dennis Silva leaves his suede shoes and D.A. haircut to Glenne Heppleston. 
Diane Silva leaves a St. Christopher medal to Mr. Smiley and his driver 

training pupils. 

Glen Simmons leaves his glasses to any junior wishing to see the light. 

William Sloan leaves 'em smiling. 

Richard Sommi leaves Mr. Young a kettle of steam to heat that "icy Biology 

Lab." 
Diane Sturtevant leaves a bottle of "Light and Bright" to anyone wanting 

to be on the lighter side of life. 
James Swanton wills "The Dusty Road" to Miss Locklin. 
Alton Sylvia leaves the endless chore of delivering groceries to someone 

with more energy. 
Mary Sylvia leaves her stack of books to anyone crazy enough to accept 

them. 
David Tavares leaves his girl 'til she graduates. 
Stephen Thomas wouldn't leave a darn thing. 
Frances Tibbetts leaves a four day week to Mr. Morgan if he can convince 

the school committee we have too much learning. 
Claire Vancini leaves her deep appreciation to Mr. Mongan for his co- 
operation and forbearance in the yearbook work. 
Virginia Vieira leaves a mirror in her locker for people whose hair isn't as 

neat as hers. 
Carole Viera leaves to Mr. Mullen a dozen Royal Palm do-nuts. 
Mary Waitt leaves her "height" to Hans Slade. 

Sandra Ward wills a shrunken gym suit to anyone wearing a size 5. 
Joan Whiting leaves the task of running up and down stairs for Miss 

Downey to anyone unlucky enough to get her study hall. 
June Willis leaves her lines of chatter to someone who can keep Mr. Pyle 

company after school. 
Esther Wood wills her make-up work to anyone Who can find time to be 

absent as much. 
Pauline Wood leaves the driver training car for someone else to wreck. 
Robert Wood wills his football spikes to Clyde Brini. 
Diana Youngman leaves her paint brushes and easel in Mrs. Brown's closet 

to Bettie Crowell. 
Paul Zanotti leaves without knowing 90 Common Errors. 
Ruby Zinani leaves that front seat in study hall to anyone foolish enough 

to sit there; that phone never stops ringing. 

Witnessed by: 

JANICE CAVICCHI 
JUDIE REMICK 



Congratulations, MEL COOMBS REAL ESTATE 



51 



WHAT'S WITH THE SENIORS 

Hangout Tassy's 

Food Pizza 

Drink „ Coke 

Movie _ Rebel without a Cause 

Actress Jane Wyman 

Actor James Dean 

Song "The Great Pretender" 

Book Battle Cry 

Sport Basketball 

Female Vocalist Theresa Brewer 

Male Vocalist _ Perry Como 

Favorite Teacher Mr. Holmes 

Favorite Course at P.H.S English 




PILGRIM BUICK-PONTIAC SALES INCORPORATED, Plymouth 




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54 



SENIOR SERENADE 



The Things I Didn't Do 
What a Dream 
I'll Never Stop Loving You 
Hard to Get 
Sentimental Journey 
Hearts Made of Stone 
I Love You 
Seventh Heaven 
Hello, Young Lovers 
I Get so Lonely- 
Heart 

Cry Me a River 
No, Not Much 
The Great Pretender 



I'll Never Know 



homework 

all A's 

vacation 

highest honors 

down the aisle graduation night 

guess who? 

???? 

chemistry lab 

the prom 

staying after 

what we thought the teachers lacked 
I'm flunking trig 

the homelessons done 

taking a test the day after a basket- 
ball game 

how I got through P.H.S. 



MOVIE REVIEW 



To Hell and Back 

The Tall Men 

Gone With the Wind 

Country Girl 

Untamed 

The Perfect Crime 

Guys and Dolls 

The Indian Fighter 

Creature from the Black Lagoon 



on the carpet 

our basketball team 

3 years at P.H.S. 

Mary Ryan 

"Sadie" Youngman 

passing notes 

P.H.S. students (?) 

Mr. Mongan 

Mr. Young's protozoa 

ROBERT BARUFALDI 



MARTHA'S GIFT and TOY SHOP 






55 



STUDENT 




* LIFE 



Norma. 






56 



JUNIOR CLASS 



OFFICERS, Left to Right: Suzanne Lekberg, 
Secretary; Russell Romboldi, Vice Presi- 
dent; Ronald Soares, Treasurer; Clyde 
Brini, President. 



if 1 J| 






■HH 




■ 






W. T. GRANT COMPANY, Known for Values 



^ 






57 



Junior Literary Page 



MORNING 

The sun's rays 

Feel softly into every open corner, 
Probing with fingers of life and heat. 
Scouring darkness from its den. 



SNOW 

The snow falls softly on the pavement; 
Man crushes his mark upon its whiteness, 
Mars its beauty, and piles it upward, 
As if waste were its only rectitude. 



REVOLUTION 

Time stops — 

Only when life ends 

And all is quiet — 

On a demolished earth. 



RAIN 

Down, down I fall, 
After a long trip, 
From mist, to drop 
Back to a world of filth. 



A TREE IN A CITY 

Always I yearn and grasp, 
For natures' ways to find me; 
Through man's molested air, 
My tangled arms reach up. 



PAINTINGS 

Painted figures on the ancient canvas, 
Motionless through time, hoping, ever calling. 
For times when canvas was marrow 
And oils were flesh. 



SUCCESS 
Life is a dreamy waterfall, 
Over which all things dive — 
Down and down, without a call 
Into man's turbulent hive — 
All falls upon the rocks and flare, 
Up and up, some form a spray, 
Then mingled with the air, 
And climb all night and day 
To heights unknown, by man alone, 
In this wise world of ours. — 



HANS SLADE 
Class of '57 



THE GREEN THUMB GARDEN and GIFT SHOP 



58 



SOPHOMORE 
CLASS 



OFFICERS, Left to Right: Ann Vandini 
Treasurer; Clare Banzi, Secretary; Ro- 
bert Duby, Vice President; Alan Brini 
President. 





HAROLD A. BOYER and SONS, Painters 



me 
is?* 



59 



Sophomore Literary Page 



OOPS! 

Miserable — that's the only word I can think of to describe the weather 
that night. The fog rolled on and off the windshield like waves on a Ber- 
muda beach, and a penetrating dampness seeped through everywhere, 
giving everything in the car a glassy, ice-like coating. I watched the speed- 
ometer cling easily to 15, and sneaked a quick look at the road ahead. There 
was little to see, as I was virtually driving blind. Home for supper? — ha! 
Just as I was about to give up hope, two redlights suddenly appeared in the 
distance. "Saved!" I thought. Quickening my pace, I followed the blamed 
thing faithfully for well over a half-an-hour. I was beginning to have my 
doubts and misgivings about my course of action when the car ahead 
stopped short; taking about four inches of my grill with it. Trying my 
best to keep calm, I shouted this to the driver in front of me, "Why the 
dickens don't you signal when you stop?" "Why should I," came the gruff 

reply. "I'm in my own garage!" 

ROBERT ZUCCHI 
Class of '58 

MY TRIP TO MARS 

One day last week my friend, Captain Video, asked me to go with him 
to Mars, a few spacometers away. We left March 5, 1996. About eleven 
hundred we climbed into the spacemobile, a small rocketship, and shot 
off into space. We took route 4289653 of the Spaceway Universal Rocket- 
way, a new spaceway system. Riding through space we saw meteors, 
comets, and asteroids shooting by. By 1300, we were just halfway to Mars, 
when we saw another spacemobile heading right for us. We radioed to it 
but there was no answer. Then they started firing with their zoomasonis 
ray cannon. 

We circled and hid behind an asteroid to wait for them to come by. 
Then they came into our firing range and we let them have it. With one 
ray we disintergrated them into space dust. Now we will never know who 
attacked us and why. 

WILLIAM NAGLE 
Class of '58 



HOBSHOLE HOUSE and MOTEL 



60 
















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62 



SCHOOL LOG 




OCTOBER 



Friday, the 17th: 
Mr. Mongan conducted the first assembly for the entire school. Our new 
music teacher, Mr. Milton, was introduced to us and led us in two songs. 
Our principal read us a study entitled, "Are you Really Grown-Up?" 

Thursday, the 27th: 
Dr. Stockdale, who appeared through the courtesy of the Plymouth Cordage 
Company, spoke on "future unlimited." Although eighty years old, Dr. 
Stockdale was one of the most dynamic and stimulating speakers Plymouth 
High School has ever had. 




NOVEMBER 

Friday, the 11th: 
The Student Council held its first dance of the year, 
a get-acquainted record hop, in the gym. Bob Wells, 
Chuck Gordon, and Dick Taylor from WPLM were 
our disc-jockeys. 

Wednesday, the 23rd: 
Instead of the usual Thanksgiving assembly, we 
were pleased by the visit of Miss Lydia Edes of 
Plymouth. She gave an interesting talk, illustrated 
with colored slides, on her trip around the world 
aboard the Yankee. 



3St5BP 





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DECEMBER 

Friday, the 25th: 
A Christmas play entitled, "Dust of the Road," was 
sponsored by the senior math class under the direc- 
tion of Miss Locklin. The cast included James Swan- 
ton as Peter Steele; Mary Ryan as Prudence Steele; 
Bob Miskelly as the uncle of Prudence; and Richard 
Beane as the tramp. 



H. A. BRADFORD and SONS, 1 Warren Avenue 






63 



SCHOOL LOG 



JANUARY 

Friday, the 27th: 
Under the direction of Mrs. Urann, a panel discus- 
sion entitled, "How Our Curriculum Can Be Im- 
proved" was held in the auditorium. Brenda Pioppi, 
Norma Scotto, and Stephen Thomas comprised the 
panel. Plymouth High was compared to Silver 
Lake on many points. 

Saturday, the 28th: 
The senior class held its first money making activity 
of the year, the Winter Whirl. With Johnny Pache- 
co's orchestra and the senior class working hard, the 
dance was moderately successful. 



FEBRUARY 

Tuesday, the 7th: 
The Science Seminar sponsored a convention of 
science clubs of Eastern Massachusetts. During the 
afternoon several interesting speakers were heard. 
After a delicious supper, the members enjoyed danc- 
ing in the gym. 





Thursday, the 9th: 
Mr. Kenneth Wheeler spoke on "Behind the TV Scenes." He surprised 
Joan Whiting by selecting her out of the audience to broadcast a "news" 
script, as an example of an audition for TV or radio. 

Friday, the 10th: 
During an assembly to commemorate Lincoln's birthday, Senator Stone told 
us many interesting, but little-known facts of the Gettysburg Address. 
Afterward, Mr. Milton lead us in an appropriate song. 




TASSY'S THE BEST IN SEAFOOD, Kingston 



64 



Sr 



TO THE TEACHERS 

Good news! You will no longer be puzzled by the expressions we use 
around the building! So that you will be able to understand us, we, the 
students of P.H.S. have written the following dictionary. 

hamburg — steak that couldn't pass the physical 

synonym — a word you use when you can't find the one you want 

activity — a lot of just that for no credit 

council dance — sole support of the student council 

excuse — none of them ever work, but here are a few samples you can 
try sometime just for laughs. "I never felt this way before." "I was 
born that way." "On the one hand, yes; on the other hand, no." 

PILGRIM — 148 pages of censorship 

p. j. parties — whee! those memories! 

American Observer — four columns around a joke section 

quiet — who knows? 

sarcasm — mathematical double-talk 

stag — wall support 

sun glasses — standard dance equipment to reduce spotlight glare 

time — that which flies on weekends and crawls backward through the 
week 

etc. — sign to make others believe you know more than you do 

vacuum — nothing shut up in a box 

goblet — male turkey 

Plymouth — a town where everyone knows what everyone else is doing, 
but reads the O.C.M. to see if they have been caught at it 

poetry — a thing you make prose of 

catalogue — a dialogue by four people 

corps — dead gentleman; corpse — dead lady 

epicure — a poet who writes epics 

octopus — a person who hopes for the best 

sinister — an old maid 

refugee — one who keeps order at a football match 

college bred — a four year loaf made from dad's dough 

study hall — forty-five minute park bench 

square — (for Miss Downey's benefit) a cat that just isn't hep 

GLEN SIMMONS 



SARRACCA'S NEWS STORE, 36 Sandwich Street 



yJthpMM 



■I?-- 



FROM THE PAST 



65 



He: "What would you do if I kissed 

you?" 

She: "I never meet an emergency 

before it arises." 

He: "And what if one arose?" 

She: "I'd meet it face to face." 

Pilgrim '33 



In Greece, a man took some clothes 

to a tailor. 

Said the tailor, "Ah, my good 

friend, Euripedes." 

Said the customer, "Ah, my good 

friend, Eumendies." 

Pilgrim '38 




PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL FACULTY (1935) 

First Row: Lydia Judd (Gardner), Elizabeth Kelly,. Barbara Coombs, Margaret Kennefick, 
Helen M. Johnson, Miriam Raymond, Katherine Lang, Doris Carey. 

Second Row: Helen C. Johnson, Jeannette Jacques, Louise Humphrey, Mary Hayes, 
Charlotte Brown, Kathleen McNerney, Nellie Locklin, Helen Swift, Amy Rafter, 
Margie Wilber. 

Third Row: Edwin Young, Arthur Pyle, John Smith, Charles Bagnall, Richard Smiley, 
Edgar Mongan, Frank Fash, Wayne Shipman. 



"Pa," said son, "What becomes of a 

ballplayer when his eyes begin to 

fail?" 

"They make him an umpire," said 

Pa. 

Pilgrim '34 



If an "S" and an "I" and an 

"O" and a "U" 

With an "X" at the end spells Su. 

And an "E" and a "Y" and an "E" 

spell "I" 

Pray what is a speller to do? 

Then if also an "S" and an "I" and 

a '•G" 

And and "H", "E", '"D", spell side — 

There is nothing on earth for a 

speller to do 

But to go and commit Siouxeye- 

sighed. 

Pilgrim '40 



THE ROGERS PRINT, Complete Printing Service 






66 






WISH WAGONS 

In quest of the ideal car, automobile designers have tended to ignore 
certain significant lines of development. In particular, these technicians 
have never taken full advantage of the tremendous advances made in the 
social sciences. 

For example , automotive scientists might tailor special automobiles 
to fit special characters. Politicians would get pushmobiles — press a 
button and a passing pedestrian gets a new campaign button and a set of 
election promises dinned into his ear. 

The harried housewife would have a shopping special that telescopes 
into a motorized market basket. The perennial papa could tour the town 
in a motorized baby buggy that telecasts a picture of his latest "little brat" 
on the trunk and booms out excitedly, "It's a boy!" every time he hits the 
brake. 

A "crisis car," too, might be constructed to roll the owner through 
the major moments of his life, just as a woman gets a dizzy bonnet to lift 
her spirits. 

A honeymoon special with cottage blinds on the windows would have 
a big water wheel built into the hood to save the couple the price of a 
trip to Niagara Falls. Later, of course, the picturesque water wheel might 
be transferred to the rear for reasons of economy, and converted into a 
workable mother-in-law disposal unit. 

DAVID NUNES 

Class of '56 

TEEN-AGERS AND FOLLOW-THE-LEADER 

Too often does a person follow the rebellious spirit of another, merely 
because the leader's example and the crowd around him lend a momentary 
bravery. Sometimes the deeds done by these crowds of suddenly coura- 
geous individuals are things which should be done out of rightful need. 
Rather often this mob action is wrong, for it enables a person to go out- 
side the limits set by his conscience by drowning his judgment in emotion. 

In mob action, teenagers have a great deal of the cruelty of children; 
and, being more easily swayed, they are able to do almost as much damage 
as adults. Thus teenagers are a great potential danger to a society, and 
their behavior may give a good basis for judging that society. 

Most teenage groups do things when in a mob or gang which in a petty 
way are wrong or cruel or foolish from a sane, adult viewpoint. When a 
group of these young people of high school age does something to which 
their school or parents are opposed, that is a petty wrong. When the more 
thoughtless teenagers tease a boy or girl different from themselves, that 
is the normal cruelty of children. When boys just over the minimum driv- 
ing age try to go as fast as possible, that is probably the recklessness caused 
by the tensions within them. But when teenagers are members of organi- 
zations designed to do a kind of internal police work arid to create domes- 
tic spies, such as those in Nazi Germany and present-day Communist coun- 
tries, that shows the barbarism of the respective societies. 

We believe that the teenagers of today do not necessarily represent a 
moral let-down but the modern ideas of greater freedom and self-expres- 
sion and that they will thus be better prepared to assume the great respon- 
sibilities of democracy. At least, such is our hope. 

ALLAN PAUL 

Class of '56 



SAMOSET GARAGE INCORPORATED, 40 Samoset Street 



67 



NO PICNIC 

Getting out this paper is no picnic. 

If we print jokes, people say we are silly. 

If we don't, they say we are too serious. 

If we clip things from other papers, 

We are too lazy to write them ourselves. 

If we don't we are stuck on our own stuff. 

If we stick close to the job all day, 

We ought to be out hunting up news. 

If we get out and try to hustle, 

We ought to be on the job in the office. 

If we don't print contributions, 

We don't appreciate true genius. 

If we do print them, 

The paper is filled with junk. 

If we make a change in the other fellow's writeup, 

We are too critical. 

If we don't we are asleep. 

Now, like as not, some guy will say 

We swiped this from some other paper. 

Well, we did. 

(From the Liguorian) 



I DREAM 

When I go to bed at night 

And my eyes are closed so tight, 

I dream! 

Queen of the campus, 
Belle of the ball, 
Heroes my escorts, 
Strong and tall. 

I ride in a Jaguar, 
I soar to great heights, 
My home is a mansion, 
My name is in lights. 

Then I awake with a sudden start 
To face the day, but still in part 
I dream! 

DIANA YOUNGMAN 
Class of '56 



MICE 



Billy Hamilton had one vice: 

Strange to say, he just loved mice. 

The ladies jumped on chairs and screamed 

While Bill, with mouse in hand, just beamed. 

His three white mice he liked the best 
And showed them to each startled guest. 
Each man would stare, each woman say, 
"How nice!" and promptly faint away. 

They multiplied quite rapidly; 
There soon were ten, where once were three. 
Then two times ten, and two times that! 
Some, long, some short, some thin, some fat. 



"This all must stop!" Bill's father swore 
As he paced up and down the floor. 
His mother raged and ranted, too; 
What on earth were they to do? 

They baited traps all through the house, 
But didn't catch one single mouse. 
They used the most expensive cheese 
And paid exterminator fees. 

Then they bought two cats to watch at night; 
This method, too, was not quite right. 
With this last phrase my poem is written: 
Does anybody want a kitten? 

WILLIAM HORTON 
Class of '56 



Compliments of CAPPANARI BROTHERS GROCERY 



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70 



Faculty and Senior Superlatives 



Cutest 
smile — Mr. Wilson and Pauline Wood 
car — Miss Downey and Peter Parkhurst 
voice — Judie Remick and Peter Prindle 
couple — Dave and Di 
noise — that 1:35 bell and grinding gears on the Pontiac 

Never 
on time — Frankie Gardner and Dave Besegai 
loses temper — Mr. Tavernelli and Pat Murphy 
stays after 1:35 < — Miss Kelly and Bobby Morse 
gets a haircut — Margie Calhoun and David Anti 
to marry — Linda Cappella and Dave Nunes 

Next 
Marlon Brando — Arthur Bartlett 
Ma Perkins — Jan Cavicchi 
Einstein — Allan Paul 

Always 
good for a laugh — Denny Furtado and Marion DiSalvatore 
busy — Claire Vancini and Bill Horton 
talking — Annmarie Pickles and Bobby Barufaldi 
reliable — Joan Whiting and Pete Romano 
smiling — Arlene Herries and Danny Duarte 
in love — Frankie Gardner and Sandra Balboni 

Least 
photogenic — Mrs. Urann (so she thinks!) 
forgettable — Jerry Pimental and Barbara Midkiff 
annoying — Claire Govoni and Jimmy Marsh 
bashful — Bill Horton and Nancy Gulhang 

First 
millionaire — Mr. Rogers and Paula Coombs 
to reach the moon — Richard Doyon (contributions welcome) 
bridegroom — Jay Horton 
bride — Barbara Maki 
to volunteer — Judie Remick and Paul Douglas 

Best 
influence on P.H.S. — Miss Locklin and Allan Sherman 
dressed — David Besegai and Joan Whiting 
politician — Bill Horton and Jan Cavicchi 

They Love 
dancing — Carole Viera and Ronnie Costa 
flirting — Barbara Midkiff and Dave Parker 
the birds — Richard Doyon and Mary Ryan 
solitude — Judie Remick and Frankie Gardner 
to be different — Mary Lou Juliani and Bob Wood 

The 
musclemen — Dave Nunes and Mr. Mullen 
voice — "Ma" Urann 

Most 
faithful to boy scout ideals — Steve McNary 
faithful to girl scout ideals — Jeannie Fryermuth 
friendly — Claire Morey and Jerry Harper 
indispensable — Mrs. Whiting and Bob Miskelly 
unpredictable — Mrs. Raymond and Mrs. Urann 



CAPE INSURANCE and TRAVEL AGENCY 



MHawinn 






71 




7 ART 
EI&LISH A 

TYPING 









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72 



ENGLISH 

The P.H.S. English Department, under the direction of Mrs. Miriam 
Raymond, equips the students of P.H.S. with a very necessary and worth- 
while tool. Students leaving this school understand that good English is 
the basis of all human relations. Except for American history, English 
is the only subject each pupil in Plymouth is required to take. 

Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Mr. Donald Mullen, Mrs. Margaret Healy, 
Mr. Roland Holmes, and Mrs. Alice Urann comprise the English Depart- 
ment. From them, we learn not only the correct usage of nouns and verbs 
but also the need for good English in our society today. 

Together with sentence structure and spelling comes the reading of 
classic and contemporary literature. When first given a book, such as 
The Virginian or Julius Caesar, we often find it a chore simply because 
we are compelled to read it. But once we dig into these books, we usually 




■ i 



find them very interesting and exciting. Some of the other books we 
read during the English course are Silas Marner, Macbeth, Little Britches, 
Hamlet, Oregon Trail, A Tale of Two Cities, and David Copperfield. 

Pupils in Mrs. Urann's English classes prepare and present an inter- 
esting topic for a panel discussion. One of these discussions was presented 
to the school this year, proving that a knowledge of good English and 
thorough research can pay dividends. Several seniors conducted a panel 
entitled "How Our Curriculum Can Be Improved." 

The period II class of Mrs. Raymond is now busy doing research on 
a topic for a term paper. This research is good practice for any students 
going on to college, for then they will often have term papers to do. 

It has been proved again and again that there is no asset more valua- 
ble than that of good English in any vocation. Graduating from P.H.S., 
we are well-prepared in our knowledge of the English language. 



PLYMOUTH HARDWARE, INC. and NERI PLUMBING CO. 



73 



COLLEGE MATH 




The college math offered in P.H.S. consists of plane geometry, algebra, trigonome- 
try, solid geometry, and analysis. These courses are taken over a period of three years; 
all under the supervision of Miss Nellie Locklin. 

In plane geometry, the sophs struggle through theorems, postulates, and axioms 
about figures ranging from triangles to hexagons. 

The juniors encounter algebra, which presents them with factors, graphs, and 
arithmetic progression. 

Trigonometry is mainly concerned with the measurement and solution of triangles; 
but other things, such as identities and radians pop up in senior math class. Solid geo- 
metry is just that: the properties and laws governing three-dimensional figures. 

BASIC MATH 




After World War II, when a national deficiency in the skills of the 
fundamentals of mathematics and the ability to apply mathematical 
knowledge was "brought to light," the value of arithmetic skills became 
more evident. Now there is more emphasis on a study of math in our 
scientific world. 

The courses offered in P.H.S. are Basic Math I, taken usually by soph- 
omores, and Basic Math II, elected by juniors and seniors. The courses 
review fundamental skills and basic processes with numbers, fractions, 
decimals, and percents and their application in the different phases of 
business and technical fields. The beginnings of algebra and applied geo- 
metry are also studied on an applied basis. 



Compliments of PLYMOUTH ROCK TROUT COMPANY 







CHEMISTRY 



PHYSICS 





BIOLOGY 



E. E. AVERY INSURANCE AGENCY, 27 Court Street 



75 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry explains the changes that take place in materials. It is 
a useful science that contributes to human welfare. Chemical processes 
are continuously going on around us. Some examples are digesting food, 
purifying water, and making cement. 

The science of chemistry has many branches, including inorganic, 
analytical, agricultural, organic, and nuclear chemistry. Inorganic deals 
with minerals. It includes the study of elements and their compounds. 
Carbon compounds are excluded for they deal with organic chemistry. 
Analytic chemistry determines the composition of substances. This branch 
of chemistry is very important in manufacturing processes. Agricultural 
chemistry is the study of nutrition of plants and animals, soil fertility, and 
the value of plant and animal products. Organic chemistry is the chem- 
istry of plants and animals. From this branch comes the carbonic com- 
pounds. Nuclear chemistry deals with atomic nuclei. The study of nu- 
clear reactions is especially important today. 

Mr. John W. Packard instructs his students on all these branches of 
chemistry. Because chemistry covers such a vast area, it is impossible 
to explore each field thoroughly in one year. 



PHYSICS 

Physics is a physical science. Its laws are the results of experimen- 
tation and are expressed in the form of mathematical equations. 

The beginnings of physics date back to the Ancients; however, the 
science had its modern beginning in the 16th and 17th centuries with such 
men as Galileo and Newton. The development of chemical physics came 
in the 19th century. This branch of physics includes heat, light, sound, 
mechanics, electricity and magnetism. Great advances have been made 
in the study of the atom. Developments are being made at a tremedous 
rate and these ideas are called "modern physics." 

It is amazing how much this science enters into our daily lives. En- 
gineering, for example, is a straight application of the principles of phy- 
sics. The atomic bomb and the hydrogen bomb are other examples. Think 
how important X-rays and radioactivity are to our lives. Great advances 
have been made in the study of the properties of matter at high pressure 
and at low temperatures. Physics stirs men's minds to the future. 



BIOLOGY 

The course in, biology is taught in Plymouth High by Mr. Claiborne 
Young. It is a subject which deals with the study of animals and plants. 
Biology is very helpful to anyone, but especially to those who intend to 
enter the field of medicine. It answers and explains many of the ques- 
tions that one has about life, such as facts about the body and what keeps 
it functioning properly. During the course of a year, among other things, 
the units of the classification of plants and animals, life processes, nutri- 
tion, animal behavior, reproduction, genetics, and conservation are studied. 

In place of laboratory work, each student is asked to prepare a prac- 
tical science project. In the spring, after weeks of constant and serious 
preparation, the projects are exhibited at a science fair, where they are 
judged. The projects range from the effect of drugs on animal intelligence 
to the culture of penicillium mold. Several of the winners have a chance 
to exhibit their projects at the state science fair. Plymouth is able to 
boast of having prize winners at this fair. 



WILDES MOTOR COMPANY, Cadillac and Oldsmobile 






76 



SCIENCE SEMINAR 

The Science Seminar of P.H.S. is an honor organization, made up of 
students who have made a particular advancement in the field of science. 
The major event of this year was the convention of Science Club of 
eastern Massachusetts, held in Plymouth High School, on February 7. 

Each of the members of the Seminar, with Janet Lamborghini as gen- 
eral chairman, and Mr. Young as advisor, worked hard to make this con- 
vention a great success. 

The afternoon program included a singsperation led by Mr. Milton, 
a business meeting, and two informative lectures. The first was given by 
Col. Eugene S. Clarke of Sandwich, who presented an illustrated talk en- 
titled "Living Fossils of the Sea." Mr. J. T. Harvell of the Arthur D. 
Little Company demonstrated the effects of low temperature on materials 
employing liquid nitrogen. 




SCIENCE SEMINAR 

Standing: Timothy Brady, Robert Miskelly, Mr. Claiborne Young, John Halunen, Peter 

Prindle. 
Seated: Margot Ruffini, Carole Ann Geaves, Janet Balboni, Ethel Bussolari, Janet Lam- 
borghini, Suzanne Lekberg. 



The business meeting was attended by delegates and representatives 
from the science clubs of six schools including West Bridgewater, Durfee, 
Watertown, Attleboro, Norwood, and Plymouth. A formal affiliation of 
these clubs was formed and a committee, with one delegate from each 
science club, was appointed to draw up a constitution for the newly 
formed organization. Watertown Science Club offered to act as host for 
the next convention to be held late in the spring. 

A delicious supper was served by Bill Pioppi and his staff; after which 
a social hour of dancing in the gym was held. The visitors enjoyed a 
demonstration of animal behavior given by biology pupils in room 101 and 
the operation of the radio station in room 102 by Glenn Simmons. 



GAMBINI'S RESTAURANT, 52 Main Street, Plymouth 



SCIENCE FAIR WINNERS 



77 



Iiluiii rmnun- jiuui 
PHENOBHKBITHL 
RFHZEQglNE CAFFEINE 






First Prize, Biology 

Janet Lamborghini 



Second Prize, Biology 

Linda Mattioli 



Third Prize, Biology 

Clare Banzi 






First Prize, Physical Sciences 

Peter Prindle 



Second Prize, Physical Sciences 

Christopher Pyle 



Third Prize, Physical Sciences 

Allan Sherman 




Honorable Mention 

Left to Right: Marguerite Hasz, Physical Sciences; Thomas Ruffini, Biology; Carole 
Greaves, Biology; Carol Voght, Biology; Janet Balboni, Physical Sciences; Suzanne 
Lekberg, Biology; Mary Phllyis Ryan, Physical Sciences. 
Absent when picture was taken: Alan Brini, Physical Sciences; Robert Duby, Biology. 



PLYMOUTH and BROCKTON STREET RAILWAYS 



78 



BIOLOGY LABORATORY STAFF 




Left to Right: Ida Mae Gore, Judy Owen, Marsha Bent, Mr. 
Claiborne Young, Judy Benassi, Clare Banzi, Edna Bradley. 

Each year, several sophomores volunteer to help care for the animals 
and materials in the biology lab. These students, under the direction of 
Mr. Claiborne Young, feed the animals, clean tools and cages, and gen- 
erally help to keep the lab clean. This experience helps them to become 
better acquainted with animals and their care. Very often the students 
who do this work, intend to study biology or science after graduating 
from high school. Thus the things they learn as lab assistants will be of 
value to them later on. 



BIOLOGY DEMONSTRATION TEAM 




Left to Right: Phyllis Herries, Ida Mae Gore, Clare Banzi, 
Linda Mattioli, Mr. Claiborne Young. 

This year four biology students toured the elementary schools to give 
demonstrations to the fourth, fifth, and sixth grade pupils. Mr. Claiborne 
Young, director of this program, and the students chose "Animal Behavior" 
as the subject of those visits. The students demonstrated their animals 
at the Hedge, Cold Spring, Cornish, and Mt. Pleasant Schools, and at the 
same time, prepared the animals for the annual science fair. The animals 
that were shown-off were pigeons, chickens, and rats. The demonstrations 
proved to be very educational to both the demonstrators and their audi- 
ences, who often asked questions about the animals. 



Congratulations Seniors, A. K. FINNEY COMPANY 



79 



ENGINEERS' COUNCIL 

The Engineers' Council consists of a small group of senior boys who 
have an interest in science and engineering. This organization was es- 
tablished this year by Mr. Packard to bring together all students interested 
in or planning to study science and engineering. 

It is hoped that this council will stimulate reading and discussion of 
engineering and give suggestions and help for science projects. In addi- 
tion, there will be discussion of college entrance, scholarships, and college 
study. A program of field trips to see engineering facilities at various 
colleges and scientific installations has been planned and initiated, the 




Standing: Allan Paul, Mr. John Packard, Peter Romano, Robert Miskelly. 
Seated: Allan Sherman, Peter Prindle, Richard Doyon, James Marsh. 



first trip being a visit to M.I.T., in which electronics and nuclear labora- 
tories were seen. Later trips are to be made at the suggestion of different 
members of the council, who will act as committee chairman for the trip 
each suggests. 

The main purpose of this council, however, is to encourage future en- 
gineers to pursue their interest in science so that they may become the 
scientists which are now and will be so badly needed. 



HOLMES GROCERY, 87 Sandwich Street, Plymouth 






80 



LATIN 




Latin in Plymouth High is taught by Mr. John Tavernelli, who teaches 
four classes; two Latin II, one Latin III, and one Latin IV class. It is a 
subject which should be studied by all, for it is the basis of the Romance 
Languages, which are spoken in almost all of the Western Hemisphere. 

Latin helps students in many of the other subjects, for a great deal 
of our English and French words are derived from Latin. It is also help- 
ful in the sciences and history. The social organization of Latin pupils is 
the Junior Classical League. 



JUNIOR CLASSICAL LEAGUE 




Third Row: Margot Ruffini, Jean Perdigao, Ann Savery, Joan Hanson, Harris Koblantz, 
Robert Duby, William Nagle, Russell Canevazzi, Dana Bumpus, Ethel Bussolari, 
Phyllis Herries, Jane Carpenter, Gail Sears. 

Second Row: Carole Ann Greaves, Ida Mae Gore, Judy Harper, Mary Silva, Susan 
Sirrico, Faye Zoccolante, Barbara Belsito, Judy Wirzburger, Barbara Marinos, Pa- 
tricia Feci, Jean Hanson, Virginia Roderick, Mr. John Tavernelli. 

First Row: Edna Bradley, Linda Mattioli, Ann Cecco, Margaret DeLisle, Judy Bennssi, 
Janet Balboni, Janice Wood, Clare Banzi, Marguerite Hasz, Bernadette Ledo, Pa- 
tricia Zion. 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY COMPANY, 39 Court Street, Plymouth 



81 



FRENCH 



The French Department of P.H.S. is under the direction of Miss Jean- 
nette Jacques, who is assisted by Mrs. Margaret Healy. Students take 
French for a variety of reasons; the college of their choice requires it, their 
relatives are French, or perhaps just because they wish to become familiar 
with the beautiful and lyrical French sounds. 

First year French is taught by either Miss Jacques or Mrs. Healy. 
The French I student does not have to study long before he will be able to 
recite simple phrases such as, "Parlez-vous francais?," or "Comment allez- 
vous?." After several months of study, he will soon be able to express 
time, count, tell the date, and recite the Lord's Prayer — all in French. 
But he will also find out that as soon as he has one thing down pat, there 
will be all kinds of exceptions to that rule. With only one year of French, 
students will find that they can understand many words in books and 
movies, that they never could before. 




Those who survive French I and go on to French II find it more 
difficult and more interesting. They read short stories, among them the 
famous one called The Necklace. They also read Malficeli. Miss Jacques 
teaches French II. 

A few brave students go on to French II, also taught by Miss Jacques. 
They work hard to improve their French pronunciation by means of a 
tape recorder, and by speaking more French in class. They write two 
book reports in French, too. The seniors are now looking forward to their 
French Day, when they will go to Boston. 

Not only does the French student in P.H.S. study the language, but he 
also studies the French people and their culture. Thus, he becomes fami- 
liar with the many famous landmarks of France, the habits of the people, 
and their way of life. 



GEORGE V. BUTTNER STORES, Plymouth and Marshfield 



82 




ART 

Early last October, Mrs. Brown led her budding young 
artists down to Brewster Gardens to sketch the scenery. After 
days of drawing and re-drawing the historic monuments, they 
were led to broader horizons — the Town Wharf. The assign- 
ment — drawings of the fishing boats; the results — drawings 
of seagulls, cars, and tourists. Therefore, the artists were 
led back to P.H.S. to continue their painting indoors. 

Work began on portrait drawing and each student be- 
came a "model-for-a-day." The results were anywhere from 
Marilyn Monroe and Tony Curtis to Gravel Gertie and 
Dracula. 

Soon work for the Pilgrim was started. There was a cover to be 
designed, silhouettes of the class officers to be made, and countless title 
pages and printing to be done. This assignment continued until the last 
of April, and each day meant copying and recopying until every detail 
was perfect. 

During December, the students started to paint colored windows for the 
holiday season. Oil was used to make the window translucent, but much to 
Mrs. Brown's horror, more oil reached the floor than touched the paintings. 

When the seniors planned their dance, they asked the art classes to 
make their decorations. As a result, seniors were seen working madly 
while curious juniors poked their heads in to see what was going on. But 
everything was done on time, and the decorations were carted off to the 
auditorium. 

The basketball games presented a new problem, for the cheerleaders 
wanted banners made for Memorial Hall. Although they were made, Mrs. 
Brown, looking at the spilled paint and broken brushes, wondered if it 
was really worth it. 

Work for graduation has now be- 
gun, and the busy pupils are trying 
to come up with new ideas to make 
this graduation the best ever. And 
as June approaches, and the seniors 
hand in their paint brushes, they will 
know they will never forget their 
wonderful experiences in art class. 




COLONIAL RESTAURANT, 39 Main Street, Plymouth 



83 



MUSIC 




Each of the classes meets every third week to sing together under 
the direction of Mr. Armen Milton. The seniors are now meeting every 
week to learn their graduation music. After many long hours of practice 
and correcting their mistakes, the students realize that they are singing 
together in perfect harmony. 

Students who are very interested in music have an opportunity to join 
the Glee Club which meets every Tuesday and Friday after school. They 
learn four part music, blending their voices in harmony. Judy Remick 
is their accompanist. 



GLEE CLUB 




Third Row: Linda Prentice, Mary Knight, Clyde Brini, Peter Romano, David Besegai, 
James Swanton, Allan Sherman, Robert Miskelly, Richard Estes, Gerald Harper, 
Russell Romboldi. 

Second Row: Carol Holmes, Suzanne Ferioli, Virginia Lovejoy, Brenda Pioppi, Sandra 
Balboni, Paul Douglas, David Bittinger, John Pimental, Donald Miskelly, Arlene 
Herries, Phyllis Herries. 

First Row: Judith Prentice, Ruby Zinani, Pauline Wood, Diane Silva, Patricia Feci, 
Mary Silva, Mr. Armen Milton, Faye Zoccolante, Carol Lacey, Linda Gallerani, Pa- 
tricia Zion. 



ZANELLO FURNITURE COMPANY, 34 Court Street 



84 



BAND 




The P.H.S. Band is under the di- 
rection of Mr. John Pacheco and 
meets every Friday. It practices both 
old and new marches, overtures, and 
various other selections. Those who 
attend our football games know that 
the band often comes up with a new 
rendition of an old song such as, 
Steam Heat or When the Saints Go 
Marshing In. The band also plays at 
the basketball games and assemblies. 
From our band, several musicians 
were selected to play in the state 
band. 



Fourth Row: Robert Strassel, Leonard Venturi, Peter Romano, John Pimental. 
Third Row: Ronald Soares, Richard Tache, David Besegai, Russell Canevazzi, 

David Bittinger, Peter DeBrusk, Glen Simmons, Victor Morini, Richard 

Estes. 
Second Row: Paul Douglas, Dennis Motta, Ronald > Quintal, Alton Sylvia, Carol 

Lacey, Robert Souza, Dennis Silva, Melvyn Bates. 
First Row: Sandra Ward, Mr. John Pacheco, Joan Whiting, Judie Remick. 



ORCHESTRA 



The P.H.S. Orchestra, also under 
the direction of Mr. John Pacheco, 
plays at graduation. After much 
practice, they do an excellent job of 
accompanying the seniors as they 
sing. 




Second Row: Robert Strassel, Ronald Soares, Richard Tache, Leonard Venturi, 
Victor Morini, Glen Simmons, Robert Souza, Dennis Silva, Peter Romano, 
David Besegai. 

First Row: Mr. John Pacheco, Alton Sylvia, Richard Estes, John Pimental, Da- 
vid Bittinger, Carol Lacey, Russell Canevazzi, Ronald Quintal, Melvyn Bates. 



PLYMOUTH INSURANCE AGENCY, 5 Town Square 



85 





Judie Remick 



Joan Whiting 



MARCHING GIRLS 




Fourth Row: Mr. John Pacheco, Suzanne Lekburg, Lorraine Surrey, Dana Bumpus, Judy 

Shaw, Janice Morgardo, Judy Wood. 
Third Row: June Midkiff, Jean Perdigao, Ann Sherman, Beverly Hall, Marsha Bent, 

Carla Enos. 
Second Row: Mary Silva, Virginia Scagliarini, Ann Savery, Mary Savi, Faye Zoccolante, 
First Row: Marietta Nelson, Janet Balboni, Ethel Bussolari, Joan Whiting, Linda Harris, 

Gail Sears, Margot Ruffini. 

Under the direction of Mr. John Pacheco, and led by Joan Whiting, the 
marching girls were organized into a drill team only this year. The girls 
marched at the half between the football games and at the home Silver 
Lake basketball game. In smart blue and white uniforms, they made a 
striking picture, and P.H.S. is very proud of them. 





Claire Vancini 



Sandra Ward 



BARBIERI'S MARKET, Quality Meats and Groceries, Plymouth 



86 




AMERICAN HISTORY 

American history students study the develop- 
ment of the United States from the discovery of 
America to automation and the Salk vaccine. Mr. 
Pyle and Mr. Mullen teach this subject, with stress 
on human relations and present day events as well 
as past wars and other important happenings. It 
is impossible to study every phase of American life 
in one year, since history is being made daily and 
we just can't keep up with it. What has made Am- 
erica great and powerful can only be discovered 
after studying the entire history of our country. 



WORLD HISTORY 

World history is a fascinating subject to those 
who are interested in people, for history teaches us 
about the various peoples of the world and their 
cultures. By studying the mistakes of the past, pos- 
sibly we can eliminate some mistakes of the future 
and become better world citizens. 

With Miss Downey leading the way, the stu- 
dents travel from prehistoric man to the Greek and 
Roman civilizations, then through the twentieth 
century and the World Wars. With the aid of many 
maps and motion pictures, history is brought to 
light in the classroom. 





PROBLEMS OF DEMOCRACY 

Problems of Democracy, taught by Mr. Mullen, 
is a study of the difficulties and dangers, both ex- 
ternal and internal, that threaten our American 
democracy. In Problems, students are presented 
with the fundamental social, economic, and politi- 
cal problems of America. Students become familiar 
with these problems in order to be prepared for the 
responsibilities of citizenship in the world of tomor- 
row. This study is divided into three distinct parts 
— the economic, social, and political aspects of civi- 
lization. The students learn the underlying factors 
that constitute our American democracy so that they 
may become good participating citizens in our own 
country. 



PLYMOUTH ROCK CLEANERS, Water Street, Plymouth 



87 



STENOGRAPHY 

Stenography, commonly known as shorthand, is 
very important to one who desires to become a sec- 
retary or to engage in some other phase of office 
work. It enables one to take down what is being 
said at a speed that cannot be equaled in longhand. 

During the first year of stenography, the stu- 
dent learns the basic forms for the alphabetic char- 
acters and combinations, develops skill in the read- 
ing of shorthand plates and her own notes, and es- 
tablishes the correct writing habits. In the second 
year, he continues to develop fluency in writing and 
reading shortland at increased speeds, acquires a 
large and varied working vocabulary, and strives to 
produce mailable letters. 





TYPING 

Typing is one of the most important subjects 
P.H.S. offers to its students. If one knows how to 
type, he can earn money either on a full-time or a 
part-time basis. 

It is especially important to college students. 
In college, the student is able to hand in tidier pa- 
pers: also, to earn extra money. For the commercial 
student, typing is an opening wedge to many differ- 
ent opportunities in business. Business letters, in- 
voices, telegrams, stencils, etc., all come easy to one 
who has been trained right, as the students are 
trained at Plymouth High. 



BOOKKEEPING 

A knowledge of bookkeeping is essential to all 
who wish to understand the modern economic sys- 
tem. Its usefulness is not restricted to practicing 
bookkeepers, but extends to responsible men and 
women engaged in all fields of business. The growth 
of business and economic problems has made book- 
keeping more necessary than ever before. 

Miss Kelly teaches bookkeeping I and Miss 
Johnson teaches bookkeeping II. Many students find 
this subject difficult at first, but as they continue to 
the second year, they realize the necessity for keep- 
ing accurate records. In bookkeeping II, there is 
practice in making records directly from business 
forms, such as purchases invoices and petty cash 
vouchers. In this class, many useful things such as 
writing checks and filing income taxes are also 
learned. 




Compliments of BROWN & CLARK INCORPORATED 



DRIVER EDUCATION 




Plymouth High established a driving course several years ago to teach 
its pupils how to drive safely. This course not only teaches safety, but 
what is more, helps teenagers to develop good habits and a good attitude 
toward driving. Statistics show that there is a definite drop in the num- 
ber of driving violations by pupils who have had proper training. In class 
the pupils learn about the mechanism of a car and how to operate it 
smoothly and efficiently. On the highway, pupils put into practice the 
safety measures they learned in the classroom. Mr. Smiley's pupils are 
taught to realize that a safe driver always stays within the limits of the 
law by obeying all signs and safety regulations. 

FUNDAMENTALS OF MECHANICS AND AUTO MECHANICS 

□ 




These courses are offered to all students interested in mechanics, whe- 
ther they are preparatory, commercial, or general students, but the boys 
outnumber girls 100 to 1. They are. primarily theory courses with limited 
practical work involved due to lack of equipment and space. The atmos- 
phere of Mr. Guidoboni's classes follows his philosophy that the basic course 
in mechanics is part of a sound general education. 

Fundamentals of machines teaches the principles of physical science 
that are the basis for many common mechanical insrtuments. This course 
is generally taken before auto mechanics and radio. Auto mechanics deals 
with internal combustion engines and the other systems of a car. The lat- 
ter course appeals to many of the boys who like to work on their own or 
the family car. 



WOOD'S FISH MARKET, Main Street, Plymouth 



iJ-T'_*«^-'J_j 



89 



BOYS' PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




The boys of Plymouth High are required to take gym classes once a 
week under the direction of Mr. Rogers. During the different seasons, gym 
classes are conducted according to the sport played that particular time 
of the year. In the fall, touch football is played, being fundamental to real 
football. In the winter months, the classes are held in the gymnasium 
where basketball is played, along with work in climbing ropes and tumb- 
ling. During the spring, the classes are once more held outside and the 
boys engage in softball in preparation for baseball. 



GIRLS' PHYSICAL EDUCATION 




In phys. ed., the girls naturally play the sports as they are in season. 
In the fall, field hockey is practiced to acquire some of the skills of the 
game. When it becomes too cold to go out-of-doors, volleyball is played 
in the gym. Basketball is played with the emphasis on trying to improve 
dribbling and shooting skills. How to tumble and how to climb the ropes 
and use the rings are learned. Come spring students again go outside to 
play softball and tennis. Under the direction of Miss Knight, the girls 
try to build themselves into good citizens through a well-directed recrea- 
tion period. 



SKIPPY'S, A snack or a meal, Pembroke Street, Kingston, Massachusetts 



90 




HOME ARTS 

Home arts in Plymouth High is divided into two parts: 
cooking and sewing. In the home arts sewing classes this 
year, students learned many useful things such as types 
and quality of materials, cutting, basting, and sewing. All 
methods of sewing a fine seam, which are used in dress- 
making, as well as the use of patterns and the sewing ma- 
chine were learned. Not only was sewing studied but also 
home grooming, personal hygiene, family relationships, and 
many things of interest in the home. Different ways of 
doing housework were also learned. Pupils were allowed 
to make what they pleased as long as it fitted into the pro- 
gram. 



In home arts cooking classes, pupils learned how to cook and plan break- 
fast and luncheon units. Cooking classes are the most interesting as not 
only are recipes and their uses studied, but also the planning of meals. The 
study of good nutrition is important, as well as the variation of foods at 
different meals. 

Table setting and service is taught so that students may learn how 
to display their attractive, nutritious meals on the family table properly 
set with dishes, silverware, and linen. Home arts is not just cooking and 
sewing either. Students learn that a happy home is one in which all the 
members of the family take pleasure in sharing their experiences. What- 
ever the size of the home, its happiness depends upon the skill and kindness 
of those who live in it. 

Homemaking is no longer done by guess work. All the material that 
science and art have gathered together are ours to benefit by. Home- 
making is an art, a profession, and a business which students have the 
opportunity to learn in home arts classes. 

It is not only a course for girls but for boys also. It is a five credit 
course, taught by Mrs. Kingman, with classes three times a week, one day 
set aside for movies, discussions, etc. Lucky is the girl whose boyfriend 
takes home arts, for she will often receive tasty morsels such as pizza or 
muffins at recess if he is a good cook. And most boys are! 




ARONS JEWELRY STORE, Fine Silver, 2 Main Street 



91 



PSYCHOLOGY 




Psych is the study of the behavior of people and why they act the 
way they do. Students learn about their emotions, why people react dif- 
ferently to the same situation, how to remember, how to study, and how 
environment affects people, to name only a few topics. Under the direc- 
tion of Mr. Wilson, class discussions are held involving many interesting 
problems and thoughts which teenagers don't usually get a chance to talk 
about in other classes. They learn to explain other peoples' actions, but 
more important, they learn about themselves. 



GLOBAL GEOGRAPHY 




In global geography, students study the geography of the entire 
world. Not only the physical points but also the people are covered. They 
study the climate of a country, its topography, and its civilization. Stu- 
dents see how climate influences the activity and energy of the people 
living within it. They find out, for example, that the people living in 
England are very energetic, but that the Eskimos are about the least ener- 
getic. They study the topography of the world beginning with the tundra 
and the taiga of the poles to the rain forests and deserts nearer the equator. 
Global pupils often find out things they never knew, such as that deserts 
are very hilly and mountainous, and not composed of sand as many people 
seem to think. 



Compliments of BERNARD'S, Ladies Apparel, 20 Court Street 



92 










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93 




IO« A WEEK 



S.A.S.. 

Collections 



SCIENCE CLUB 




RADIO CLUB 



V1KMU 



GRADUATION 




PRESS 
CLUB 



-' ■ 



^j. 






^*CavQ. t co 



94 



NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

Back Row: Andrew Balboni, Janet Lamborghini, Vivian Douylliez, Suzanne Lekburg, Jean 
Freyermuth, Janet Balboni, Arlene Herries, Jean Perdigao, Carole Ann Greaves, Mr. 
Donald Wilson. 

Front Row: Allan Paul, Marguerite Hasz, Peter Romano, Joan Whiting, Robert Miskelly, 
Claire Vancini, Gerald Harper. 



The highest honor Plymouth High School confers on its students is 
that of membership in the Massasoit Chapter of the National Honor Society. 
Students who are outstanding examples of character, leadership, scholar- 
ship, and service are chosen by a combined vote of the students and faculty. 
At an impressive ceremony held in March, the new members were inducted 
into this society. At the present time, there are sixteen members with Mr. 
Wilson as advisor. This year's ceremony was different from any held 
before. The old members wrote new speeches, explaining in detail the 
objectives of the society and its emblems. The parents of the members 
were secretly invited to attend the induction of their sons and daughters 
into the honor society. 

Our chapter participated in the installation at Silver Lake because they 
have established a new chapter this year. Plymouth had a wonderful time 
and were cordially treated by all the students and teachers. 



KENT'S BEAUTY SALON, 19 Court Street, Plymouth 



95 



HONOR GROUP 

Those seniors who have, maintained an average of eight-five or better 
for three years find themselves members of the honor group at the end of 
the second term. If other seniors find that by the end of the third term 
their marks average eighty-five, they, too, become members of this organ- 
ization. 

It is the privilege and the responsibility of the honor group to plan the 
program for graduation. At the first few meetings, the chairmen for the 
different committees and a general chairman are chosen. Then the group, 
under the direction of Mrs. Raymond, proceeds to finds a theme, develop 
it, chose the students who are to have writing and speaking honors, and 
pick the music to be sung, among other things. 

Much credit is due the honor group for they work very hard to make 
graduation as perfect as possible. The members meet every Monday night 
in the high school to work and solve the problems connected with plan- 
ning a beautiful graduation such as Plymouth High has made traditional. 



HONOR GROUP 

■ 




Third Row: Allan Paul, Peter Romano, James Marsh, Peter Prindle, Gerald Harper, 

Allan Sherman. 
Second Row: Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Judith Bartlett, Diana Youngman, Jean Freyer- 

muth, Barbara Maki, Claire Vancini. 
First Row: Nancy Gulhang, Joyce Parker, Joan Whiting, Arlene Herries, Pauline Wood, 

Bernadette Ledo, Marguerite Hasz. 



JOSE'S RESTAURANT for good food, Kingston 



96 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 




Third Row: Lawrence Estes, Howie Borsari, Dennis Pinto, Gerald Harper, Jer- 
ome Santos, Peter Romano, Clyde Brini, John Quinn, Alan Brini, Paul 
Douglas. 

Second Row: John Pimental, Jacqueline Lewis, Liza Rossi, Judy Shaw, Janet 
Balboni, Jean Hanson, Judie Remick, Judy Bartlett, Jean Freyermuth, Clare 
Banzi, Linda Mattioli, Stephen Thomas. 

First Row: Robert Miskelly, Mr. Carlo Guidoboni, Miss Ellen Downey, Janet 
Lamborghini, David Besegai, Marie Serra, Ronald Soares, Mrs. Lydia Gard- 
ner, Mrs. Helen Bagnell, Joan Whiting. 



The Student Activities Society, or 
the S.A.S. includes all the students 
and faculty of P.H.S. in its member- 
ship. The governing body of - this 
organization is the Student Council. 
The council has been especially busy 
this year, for it undertook many 
worthwhile enterprises. 

The council sponsored a get-ac- 
quainted dance in the early fall for 
the members of our school to meet 
the new students. Then, in Novem- 
ber, the fall convention of all the stu- 
dent councils of Southeastern Mas- 
sachusetts was held at Cohasset, and 
many of the members planned to go. 
The council sponsored dancing at re- 
cess on Tuesday and Thursday and 
started a record library. It collected 
money for the Red Cross and for the 
polio fund. We are certainly proud 
of our council and all the work it has 
done. 



POLIO FUND COLLECTORS 



1 



Every year since 1946, the S.A.S. 
has carried on a project to which each 
member is asked to give "a penny a 
day." When the time came for the 
students to vote for the charity to 
which their money would be donated, 
there seemed to be little doubt in 
anyone's mind as to what it should 
be. The student body voted unani- 
mously to give the money to the 
March of Dimes, since so many of 
their friends and relatives were 
stricken with polio last year. The 
student council acted as the collectors 
in the homerooms and although col- 
lections were late in starting, the stu- 
dents still gave the regular five quo- 
tas. 

The S.A.S. is proud and happy to 
receive the praise and honors that 
have been bestowed on it during the 
past years, but moreover, each stu- 
dent in his own way feels good inside 
for doing his small part to help those 
less fortunate than himself. 




Third Row: Gerald Harper, Robert Miskelly, John Quinn, Lawrence Estes, 

Dennis Pinto, Vincent Salvi. 
Second Row: Howie Borsari, Paul Douglas, Miss Ellen Downey, Judy Shaw, 

Janet Balboni, Jean Hanson, Clare Banzi, Sandra Ward. 
First Row: Jacqueline Lewis, Liza Rossi, Janet Lamborghini, Joan Whiting 

David Besegai, Judy Bartlett, Judie Remick, Beverly Diaz. 



Compliments of WILLIAM MAINI, Mason 



97 



TEN-CENT-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 



P.H.S. has a wonderful plan called 
the ten-cent-a-week plan. By paying 
only ten cents a week, the students 
gain free admsision to all the home 
basketball, football, and baseball 
games and track meets, and receive 
a free yearbook. This money helps 
support the student council ac- 
tivities. There are two collectors in 
each homeroom, who try to keep the 
members payed up to date. Mr. Ro- 
mano is the advisor and Jerry Pimen- 
tal is the head collector. 




Third Row: Donald Miskelly, Stephen Thomas, Leonard Venturi, David Mel- 

evsky, Robert Romanow, Eugene Oldham, Thomas Rulfini, Jerome Santos, 

John Pimental, Frank Gardner. 
Second Row: Melvyn Bates, Robert Alberici, David Houde, Barbara Cremonini, 

Mary Savi, Judith Brenner, Clare Banzi, Mary Waitt, Andrew Balboni, 

George Govoni, Mr. Mario Romano. 
First Row: June Midkiff, Beverly Fohrder, Brenda Pioppi, Claire Morey, Janice 

Cavicchi, Diane Pizzotti, Janice Morgardo, Barbara Belsito, Susan Sirrico, 

Barbara Locatelli, Jane Pimental. 



BANK TELLERS 




Students who are good in adding 
figures are chosen to be bank tellers 
on Wednesday mornings. There are 
two tellers in each homeroom, one 
for the Plymouth National Bank and 
the other for the Plymouth Five Cent 
Savings Bank. With Miss Kelly as 
their advisor, the tellers do an ex- 
cellent job in collecting the students' 
money and seeing that it is added 
properly. 



Third Row: Sandra Watson, Carol Lacey, Vivian Douylliez, Richard Estes, 

Thomas Brown, Paul Vecchi, Rollene Darsch, Virginia Scagliarini, Liza 

Rossi. 
Second Row: Nancy Gulhang, Annmarie Pickles, Edith Giar, Dorothy Parker, 

Barbara Bratti, Joan Thissell, Claire Morey, Frances Tibbetts, Esther Wood, 

Margot Ruffini. 
First Row: Virginia Lovejoy, Jean Hanson, Marion Benassi, Geraldine Carmel- 

lo, Miss Elizabeth Kelly, Rose Cannucci, Elissa Benassi, Mary Lou Enos. 



Congratulations from THE MARINER, in Manomet 



98 



RADIO CLUB 




Standing: Robert Lillich, Allan Sherman, Mr. John Packard, John Halunen. 
Seated: Timothy Brady, Glen Simmons, Stephen McNary, Robert Strassel. 



OFFICE ASSISTANTS 




Third Row: Joan Hanson, Gerald Harper, Arthur Bartlett, Brenda Petocchi, Jean 

Hanson. 
Secoud Row: Patricia Lemieux, Vivian Douylliez, Carol Lacey, Carla Enos, Janice Gren- 

nell. 
First Row: Virginia Lovejoy, Jacqueline Lewis, Mrs. Marion Whiting, Marion Benassi, 

Marion DiSalvatore, Claire Govoni. 



Local milk from AVERY FARMS, 16 Main St., Plymouth 



99 



LIBRARY STAFF 




Standing:: Jean Hanson, Barbara Cremonini, Ariel Anderson, Barbara Belsito, Liza Rossi. 
Seated: Barbara Maki, Sandra Balboni, Diane Silva, Linda Cappella, Mary Waitt, Mar- 
guerite Hasz. 



PRESS CLUB 




Standing-: Judy Benassi, Patricia Zion, Clyde Brini, Richard Estes, James Swanton, Bar- 
bara Belsito, Ann Cecco, Linda Harris, Mr. John Tavernelli. 

Seated: Marion Benassi, Carol Ann Greaves, Dana Bumpus, Janet Balboni, Marguerite 
Hasz, Linda Mattioli, Clare Banzi, Tara Sturgis. 



DEXTER'S SHOE STORE, shoes for the family, Plymouth 



100 



SUNSETTERS 




Standing: Barry Davis, Robert Romanow, Judy Owen, Joseph Carreira, Sharon Cadman, 
Robert Martin, Martin Hasz, David Houde, Glen Simmons, Sandra Weichel, Mr. 
Claiborne Young, Robert Duby, Allan Sherman, William Nagle, Wayne Pimental, 
William Eaton, John Quinn, Dennis Pinto. 

Kneelii'g: Patricia Zion, Susan Prindle, Ida Mae Gore, Judy Harper, Linda Boutin, Bar- 
bara Belsito, Margaret DeLisle, Judy Wirzburger, Faye Zoccolante, Mary Silva. 








Good luck to P.H.S. teams, LELAND'S RESTAURANT. 



jm^auBs^mm 



SPORTS 



^H 



*-<. 



*W1 




■».rf»# 



CIT 








1 




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GIRLS' LOCKEI 






Bftal 



103 




JAN 



JUDY 







Our beautiful P.H.S. cheerleaders have 
yelled themselves hoarse at the football and 
basketball games. It was much easier to cheer 
when our team was winning, but these girls 
also cheered with plenty of pep when we 
were losing. Under Miss Knight's guidance, 
they have practiced after school learning sev- 
eral new cheers and revising some of the 
old ones. 

CHEERLEADERS 




Standing: Ariel Anderson, Nan Richardson, Brenda 
Petocchi, Judith Bartlett, Joyce Parker, Tara 
Sturgis. 

Kneeling: Co-captains Janice Cavicchi and Marie 
Serra. 



Chinaman once, Chinaman twice, 
Holy jumping Chinaman rice, 
Stand 'em on their heads, boys, 
Stand 'em on their feet, 
Plymouth High School can't be beat. 



MARIE 




JOYCE 




PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP, 18 Main Street, Plymouth 



104 



FOOTBALL 




FOOTBALL SQUAD 

Back Row: Mr. Mario Romano, Peter Geller, Stanley Ferreira, M. Robischeau, Robert 
D'Ambrosio, George Gavoni, Alan Brini, Cooper Beauregard, John Halunen, William 
Nagle, Victor Morini, Mr. Donald Mullen. 

Front Row: Elliott Fillippini, Joseph Alves, Timothy Brady, John Pimental, Peter Ro- 
mano, Jerome Santos, Robert Wood, Alan Malaguti, Clyde Brini. 



A Thriller All the Way 

Plymouth High marked the opening of its 1955 football season by play- 
ing the "Big Green" of Abington on October 22. For the first two periods, 
both teams fought a bitter battle, with Abington leading 6-0 at half-time. 
Having the wind at their backs, the Shiretown boys took to the air in the 
third period. Their first and only touchdown was scored on a forty-yard 
pass play from Brini to Captain Jerry Santos. Previous to this score, 
Santos intercepted an Abington pass and ran it into their end-zone only 
to have the play nullified because of a clipping penalty against Plymouth. 
In the fourth and final period, Abington scored their second touchdown 
on a dive off tackle; then swept right end for the extra point. Once again 
Plymouth took possession of the ball and in a futile attempt tried to pass 
their way to another tally. Just as Santos completed a pass to Romano 
for a first down, time ran out; the score reading Abington 13, Plymouth 6. 
Lack of reserves on the bench cost Coach Mullen's boys the game, as only 
thirteen players saw action. The bright spots in Plymouth's backfield 
were Jerry Santos and Tim Brady. Alan Brini, as a sophomore and new- 
comer to the team, also played an outstanding game at center. 

They Were Just Too Tough 

On October 29, Plymouth's eighteen man squad met Barnstable at Hy- 
annis. As had been predicted, the Cape schoolboys were too tough, rolling 
up two touchdowns in the first eight plays from scrimmage and intercept- 
ing a Plymouth pass for another. At the end of the first period, Plymouth 
trailed 21 to 0. In the second quarter, Barnstable ran for another touch- 
down, getting their fourth and final score of the test. Plymouth's initial 
first down came at the start of the second half when Captain Jerry Santos 



MEL'S AUTO REPAIR, 109 Court Street, Plymouth 



*v>'< 



105 



poured through his left tackle for eleven yards. The Shiretowners dom- 
inated the play in the last period after Pete Romano intercepted a Barn- 
stable pass on the Plymouth twenty-three. They then made their way to 
the Barnstable three yard line as a result of a fourteen yard pass to Santos. 
Plymouth fumbled on a sweep around right end with Barnstable recov- 
ering. This was the Blue and White's only scoring threat in the game. 
The final score showed Barnstable had won by a 27 to margin, but credit 
must be given to our boys for holding the opposition scoreless in the 
second half. 

Upset by Randolph 

The Randolph game, scheduled for November 5, was played the fol- 
lowing Monday at our own Standish Avenue Field. Nevertheless, Plym- 
outh lost its third succesive game via the shutout route, 26-0. Once again 
the same situation existed as in previous contests; Coach Mullen had no 
reserve strength with which to substitute. Randolph's first touchdown 
came early in the opening period with a twenty-nine yard rush around 
right end, followed by a successful attempt for the extra point. In the 
second quarter, they scored again, this time by a sweep around left end. 
Just before the half ended, Randolph's quarterback intercepted a pass for 
their third score, making it 20-0 at half-time. After recovering a Plym- 
outh fumble in the third period, the "Red and White" tallied for their 
final touchdown by a smash off tackle. Johnny Pimental was Plymouth's 
main standout, contributing numerous tackles on defense. 

Somerset Proves too Strong 

Plymouth High traveled to Somerset and played the Veterans' Day 
game on a muddy-sawdust, covered field on Friday, November 11. As was 
expected, Somerset proVed much too strong for the Shiretowners, scoring 
twice in the first period and twice in the second, while Plymouth remained 
scoreless. Meanwhile, Plymouth's hopes for a touchdown sank lower and 
lower. In the second half, however , Somerset, still playing with its start- 
ing eleven, was unable to push over a touchdown. Yet, Plymouth like- 
wise was unable to score. When the final whistle sounded, Somerset had 
won by a score of 25 to 0. Johnny "Bug" Pimental and Pete Romano both 
played outstandingly on defense. 

Endurance Isn't Enough 

On November 19, Plymouth High ended its short season, with a lose to 
Middleboro, 14 to 0. The game was played on a snow-covered Standish 




Left to Right: Coach Donald Mullen, 
Captain Jerry Santos, Athletic Director 
Mario Romano. 



PETE'S DRIVE-IN Kingston; Root beer, Our Specialty 



106 



wJS&S&S^ 1 




BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 



SOMEBODY GOOFED 



Avenue Field with conditions everything but favorable for the Plymouth 
offense. For the first two periods, both teams fought without a score, as the 
Shiretowners halted a Middleboro threat on the Plymouth four yard line. 
The band and marching girls, who performed during the half, all but lost 
their fingers and toes from the cold. Despite the weather, Middleboro took 
to the air in the third quarter, thus setting up their first touchdown cli- 
maxed by a plunge through center by Co-captain Stephens. In the fourth 
period, Middleboro moved to the Plymouth fifteen yard line, but a pass 
interception by Clyde Brini gave Plymouth the ball with only a few min- 
utes of playing time remaining. Joe Alves then took a pitch and picked 
up six yards, but on the next play, Brini fumbled and Middleboro re- 
covered. The "Black and Orange" capitalized on this fumble by scoring 
the final touchdown of the afternoon. 

We lost these five games for a definite reason: lack of boys, NOT lack 
of luck. What we had for a team was in good condition and we suffered 
no serious injuries. But without the boys to play, we could do nothing. 
There weren't even enough players to scrimmage since twenty-two are 
needed and there were only nineteen at the end of the season. There 
even occurred games when Coach Mullen had no guards to substitute. At 
this time, he was on the verge of postponing the remaining football games. 

Credit is due to the following players for their stamina and stick-to- 
it-tiveness who were the hard core during the football season: Jerry Santos, 
Pete Romano, Bod Wood, seniors; Tim Brady, Clyde Brini, Al Malaguti, 
Elliot Fillippini, Stanley Ferriera, Cooper Beauregard, juniors; Al Brini, 
Josie Alves, Malcolm Robischeau, and George Govoni, sophomores. 

MAY THEIR TRIBE INCREASE !!! 



SUMMARY 



I \ * 

8*1 



OCTOBER 22 


PLYMOUTH 


6 


ABINGTON 


13 


OCTOBER 29 


PLYMOUTH 





BARNSTABLE 


27 


NOVEMBER 7 


PLYMOUTH 





RANDOLPH 


26 


NOVEMBER 11 


PLYMOUTH 





SOMERSET 


25 


NOVEMBER 19 


PLYMOUTH 





MIDDLEBORO 


14 


COOPER'S REXALL DRUG, Shirley Square 


! and Main Street 



107 



CROSS COUNTRY 

In a cross country race, the team with the least point score wins the 
meet. This is because a team gets points according to the way its players 
finish. (1st place one point, 2nd place two points, etc.) This year the 
Plymouth High School Cross Country Squad was composed of only five 
runners: three seniors, one junior, and one sophomore. Consequently, if 
anything happened to one of the runners, a meet would surely be lost. The 
team was also handicapped by the loss of a month of practice, because of 
the postponement of the opening of school. 

For the opening of their '55 season, the Plymouth Harriers visited 
Whitman on October 19th. They met sixteen of the Whitman runners. 
Paul Douglas finished in third place; Eugene Hasbrouck, fifth; Dennis 
Pinto, eighth; Jim Swanton, tenth; and Bob Miskelly, eleventh. The score 
was 37-20 in favor of Whitman. 

The Blue and White next traveled to Middleboro on October 24th, 
with only four men. Against thirteen Middleboro runners, Gene Hasbrouck 
finished first with a time of 15:38; Paul Douglas came in second in 15:39; 
Denny Pinto, fifth; and Jim Swanton, seventh. Plymouth made a good 
showing and came very close to victory, but handicapped without that 
fifth runner, they lost. 

On October 27, P.H.S. met Middleboro on the hilly Plymouth course. 
This time Plymouth had five runners. However, the team that they had 
come so close to defeating the week before had added five new runners 




Standing: Eugene Hasbrouck, Coach Harold Rogers, Dennis Pinto. 
Seated: Robert Miskelly, James Swanton, Paul Douglas. 

to their team. Gene Hasbrouck crossed the finish line first with a time of 
15:10; Paul Douglas second in 15:28; Pinto finished seventh in 16:26; Mis- 
kelly ninth in 16:40; and Swanton eleventh in 16:46. Plymouth lost again 
to Middleboro 30 - 26. 

On November 2nd, the Plymouth Harriers ran against Holbrook on the 
Plymouth course. Even with the advantage of their own course, Holbrook 
proved to be a strong opposition. They won the first five places, which 
assured them of winning the meet. Douglas finished in sixth place and 
Hasbrouck, ninth for the Plymouth team. 

At the District Meet in East Bridgewater on November 8th, the Blue 
and White was again handicapped without a fifth runner. They ran in 
Class A against the top runners from different schools throughout this 
district. Hasbrouck crossed the finish line at the end of the 2 x k mile course 
in 26th place, Douglas 29th, Pinto 39th, and Swanton 41st. Plymouth 
finished the meet in the last place in Class A, 



Best wishes for a bright future, LELAND'S 




fLYm 




M\ 



'SS&jB 1 


yywK 


■ 




A 






^F ^^^^ 



109 



BASKETBALL 




BASKETBALL TEAM 

Third Row: Coach Hank Rogers, John Pimental, Russell Canevazzi, Robert Baker, Gerald 
Montanari, Richard Tache, Robert Souza, William Sloan, David Tavares, Alan Brini. 

Second Row: Lawrence Martin, Jerome Santos, Arthur Kierstead, Richard Beane, Wil- 
liam Pioppi, William Nagle, Paul Vecchi, George Govoni, Dennis Pinto, Russell Rom- 
boldi, David Melevsky. 

Front Row: Peter Romano, Frank Gardner, Ronald Soares, Hans Slade, David Nunes, 
James Marsh, Clyde Brini, David Besegai. 






Coach Rogers' hoopsters opened their Old Colony League schedule 
playing host to Whitman on Wednesday, January 4th. Plymouth took the 
lead right after the starting whistle and still maintained an impressive 
lead at half time. In the third period, Whitman began to hit from the out- 
side and moved to within three points of the "Blue and White," but Plym- 
outh's late last-quarter surge gave us a 75-68 victory. 

The following Friday, Plymouth went to Rockland where they had a 
very easy time for themselves, defeating their opponents, 81-54. The only 
time the Shiretowners were in trouble was at the beginning of the game, 
when they trailed by six points. 

January 16th, the Blue and White traveled to Wareham to play their 
cape town rivals before a jam-packed gym. Wareham got off to a quick 
start while Plymouth just couldn't get going. At half time, Wareham led 
by one point, as Plymouth hooped three quick baskets just before the 
period ended. In the third quarter, each team kept up the pace, taking 
turns scoring. Finally, in the last period, Plymouth managed to take a 
three point lead, but not for long, as Wareham scored eight successive 
points. When the buzzer sounded, Wareham had won 45 to 42. 

On Friday, January 13, Plymouth played their fourth league game, 
this one against Abington at Memorial Hall. The score at half time read: 
Plymouth 42, Abington 32, with the password being, "Feed Slade." This 
"password" payed off as the Blue and White romped to an 82 to 68 victory. 

Plymouth High School's great basketball team followed by cheering 
fans, journeyed to Middleboro on Tuesday, January 17, and had an easy 



E. C. WARNSMAN JR. INSURANCE AGENCY, Call Kingston 424 






no 



4 *A*V. iV <*/<••>*, 



iit' 1 '" "<***ii 




time for themselves, defeating the Black and Orange, 76 to 52. This game 
marked the fourth win for Plymouth. 

On Friday, Hingham came to Plymouth and showed that they were a 
good ball team as they led the Shiretowners at the end of the first period 
by two points. (Any team has to be good to lead us!) At half time, Plym- 
outh led 31 to 26 and went on to win the game, 65 to 54. 

Coach Hank Rogers' charges next battled Silver Lake at the new Re- 
gional High School in Kingston, playing before a packed gym of more than 
thirteen hundred spectators. Plymouth got off to a good start, and led 
33 to 27 at the half. Silver Lake came back strong in the third period, cut- 
ting the lead to one point. When the final buzzer rang, the Shiretowners 
had won, 61 to 59. As a result, Plymouth, Wareham, and Silver Lake were 
tied for first place in Old Colony competition. 

Beginning the second round of the Old Colony League play, Plymouth 
found Whitman very strong on their home court. A very disappointed 
Plymouth team suffered its second loss, when the Whitman players came 
from behind in the last quarter to win 64 to 57. 

Tuesday, January 31, the boys of the Blue and White romped to a 74 
to 63 victory over Rockland High. Our boys were never in trouble at 
any time during the game. Soares and Slade were Plymouth's high 
scorers. 

Plymouth played host to Wareham on Friday, February 3, before a 
crowd of more than twelve hundred. Coach Clem Spillane's crew had 
the lead at half time, 35 to 34, and the crowd was on its feet most of the 
time. But during the last two periods, the Shiretowners dominated the 
scoring, getting 37 points to Wareham's 19. Plymouth won this thriller, 
71 to 54. 

Plymouth lost its chance to tie with Wareham for first place, when 
they lost to Abington. Leading at half time by only five points, Plymouth 
knew that Abington was no pushover on their home court. Twice in the 
third period the Shiretowners blew eight point leads, and after Abington 
went out in front in the fourth quarter, Plymouth couldn't surge ahead. 
The final score showed Abington the winner, 60 - 58. 

Plymouth High easily defeated Middleboro on February 10, 73 to 57. 
This was Middleboro's twelfth successive defeat. Soares scored 19 points 
for P.H.S. 



Compliments of LOUIS KNIFE and SON 



Ill 



The next contest found Plymouth defeating Hingham 64-60, thus be- 
coming eligible for the Tech Tournament. Plymouth's defense weakened 
in the fourth period, allowing Hingham to score 26 points, and as a result, 
the Shiretowners found themselves in a close battle during the final 
minutes. 

On Thursday, February 16, Plymouth High closed its Old Colony 
League schedule, playing host to Silver Lake before a packed Memorial 
Hall of approximately 1400 spectators. Coach Hank Rogers' boys got off 
to an eleven point lead in the first period and led by seventeen points at 
half time. Silver Lake found the range in the last half, however, and 
came to within one basket of tying Plymouth late in the fourth quarter. 
When the final buzzer sounded, the Shiretown boys had won their eleventh 
game of the season, 74 to 66. 

A great deal of credit must be given to Coach Rogers who assembled 
and developed a very inexperienced group of boys into a winning ball club 
— a team which at the start of the season critics thought would be lucky 
to finish in fifth place. 

As this is going to press, Plymouth has beaten Saint Patricks of Water- 
town in the first round of the Tech Tourney, and is due to meet Wareham 
for the second round. 









SUMMARY 








JANUARY 


4 


PLYMOUTH 


75 


WHITMAN 


68 


SOARES 


18 


JANUARY 


6 


PLYMOUTH 


81 


ROCKLAND 


54 


SLADE 


20 


JANUARY 


10 


PLYMOUTH 


42 


WAREHAM 


45 


ROMANO, BRINI 


12 


JANUARY 


13 


PLYMOUTH 


82 


ABINGTON 


68 


SLADE 


32 


JANUARY 


17 


PLYMOUTH 


76 


MIDDLEBORO 


52 


BRINI 


19 


JANUARY 


20 


PLYMOUTH 


65 


HINGHAM 


54 


SOARES 


22 


JANUARY 


24 


PLYMOUTH 


61 


SILVER LAKE 


59 


SLADE 


17 


JANUARY 


27 


PLYMOUTH 


57 


WHITMAN 


64 


SLADE 


19 


JANUARY 


31 


PLYMOUTH 


74 


ROCKLAND 


63 


SOARES, SLADE 


13 


FEBRUARY 3 


PLYMOUTH 


71 


WAREHAM 


54 


ROMANO 


14 


FEBRUARY 


7 


PLYMOUTH 


58 


ABINGTON 


60 


SLADE 


18 


FEBRUARY 


10 


PLYMOUTH 


73 


MIDDLEBORO 


57 


SOARES 


19 


FEBRUARY 


14 


PLYMOUTH 


64 


HINGHAM 


60 


SOARES 


18 


FEBRUARY 


16 


PLYMOUTH 


74 


SILVER LAKE 


66 


GARDNER 


26 





















WARD and BRADY Sign Painters, Plymouth 



HOME 




BASEBALL 1955 



113 




Standing: Mr. Donald Mullen, Victor Morini, Ronald Parker, Richard Dunham, Donald 

Lopes, Ronald Soares, Peter Romano, James Ellis, Elliott Fillippini, Paul Douglas, 

Allan Fergeuson, Mr. Anthony Spath. 
Seated: Timothy Brady, Jerome Santos, Gerald Pimental, Ronald Gomes, Alvin Boyer, 

Larry Paul, Charles Tassinari, John Zaniboni, Frank Gardner, Stanley Miller, Bruce 

Jenny. 



19 


55 S< 


:hedule 




1956 SCHEDULE 


PLYMOUTH 


3 


ABINGTON 


2 


PLYMOUTH 


WHITMAN 


PLYMOUTH 


6 


ROCKLAND 





PLYMOUTH 


SILVER LAKE 


PLYMOUTH 


10 


MIDDLEBORO 


1 


PLYMOUTH 


MIDDLEBORO 


PLYMOUTH 





WHITMAN 


1 


PLYMOUTH 


WAREHAM 


PLYMOUTH 


4 


MIDDLEBORO 





PLYMOUTH 


HINGHAM 


PLYMOUTH 





WHITMAN 


3 


PLYMOUTH 


BRAINTREE 


PLYMOUTH 


8 


HINGHAM 


9 


PLYMOUTH 


ROCKLAND 


PLYMOUTH 


1 


WAREHAM 


5 


PLYMOUTH 


ABINGTON 


PLYMOUTH 


7 


BRAINTREE 


4 


PLYMOUTH 


SILVER LAKE 


PLYMOUTH 


6 


HINGHAM 


7 


PLYMOUTH 


MIDDLEBORO 


PLYMOUTH 


9 


ABINGTON 


2 


PLYMOUTH 


WAREHAM 


PLYMOUTH 


6 


WAREHAM 


10 







Plymouth won 8 and lost 6 



E. S. BURNS INSURANCE AGENCY — Real Estate 



114 



GIRLS FIELD HOCKEY 



■ 






2t2h i 
I 

I ■ 







4 W'.J*. 



FIELD HOCKEY 

Third Row: Judith Dunham. Judith Harper, Fave Zoccolante, Ida Gore. Ann Cecco, Ann 
Vandini, Margaret DeLisle, Clare Banzi, Mary Silva. 

Second Row: Miss Majorie Knight, Carol D'Ambrosio. Dana Bumpus. Lindn Mattioli, 
Tara Sturgis, Janet Lamborghini, Patricia Zion, Liza Rossi, Virginia Scagliarini, 
Judith Benassi, Carol Lacey. 

First Row: Jane Murphy, Vivian Douylliez. Jeanette Basler, Jean Freyermuth, Janet 
Balboni, Beverlv Diaz, Paula Coombs, Mary Ryan, Marietta Nelson, Ariel Ander- 
son, Carole Greaves. 

On October 26, the P.H.S. girls played their first hockey game of the 
season against Silver Lake. Silver Lake scored in the first half after con- 
tinually pressing the Plymouth defense. Hereafter, the ball was carried 
from one end of the field to the other with neither team able to score, a 
goal. The final score was: Silver Lake 1; Plymouth 0. 

Two days later, Plymouth played its second game, this time against 
Orleans. Orleans scored a goal early in the game, but Plymouth bounced 
back in the second half to score the tying goal. Neither team scored 
after that, in a well-played game. Final score: Plymouth 1; Orleans 1. 

Plymouth played next against Abington on November 2. Abington 
got off to a good start with two goals and led at the half, 2-0. Plymouth 
controlled the ball during most of the remaining game but was able to 
score only one goal. Final score was: Abington 2; Plymouth 1. 

On Thursday, November 3, Plymouth traveled to Marshfield. The 
girls did not pay much attention to the misty weather. Marshfield made 
five goals in the first half, after which they were unable to score. How- 
ever, Plymouth was also unable to score, and the game ended, Marshfield 
5, Plymouth 0. 

Plymouth played Bridgewater on November 9, at Plymouth. Neither 
team had won a game and it was a battle from beginning to end. Plym- 
outh scored two goals in the first half but both were nullified because 
someone was off-side. Although they played hard, Plymouth was de- 
feated, 3-0. 

A determined hockey team took the field against Middleboro for 
their last game of the season, on November 17. Before the half was over, 
Middleboro scored four goals, Plymouth being unable to penetrate the 
Middleboro defense. In the second half, Plymouth worked hard but 
managed to get only two goals. The final score: Middleboro 5; Plymouth 
2. 



THE MEMORIAL PRESS, Middle Street, Plymouth 




115 



BASKETBALL 




BASKETBALL 

Third Row: Patricia Barrett, Faye Zoccolante, Jane Murphy, Ida Gore, Brenda Canal, 
Sandra Weichel, Lorraine Surrey, Ann Cecco, Ann Vandini, Margaret DeLisle, 
Clare Banzi, Virginia Scagliarini, Ann Sherman, Carla Enos, Judith Dunham. 

Second Row: Miss Marjorie Knight, Ethel Bussolari, Sharon Cadman, Geraldine 
Keough, Carole D'Ambrosio, Dana Bumpus, Linda Mattioli, Patricia Zion, Suzanne 
Lekberg, Mary Ryan, Mary Lou Giar, Liza Rossi, Mar Silva, Judith Benassi, 
Judith Harper, Carol Lacey. 

First Row: Janet Balboni, Beverly Diaz, Judith Bartlett, Jeanette Basler, Ariel An- 
derson, Jean Freyermuth, Paula Coombs, Vivian Douylliez, Tara Sturgis, Marietta 
Nelson, Carole Greaves, Joan Whiting. 

The P.H.S. Girls' Basketball Team opened its season on December 
30, playing the Alumni. The Alumni held a slight margin until the 
fourth quarter when the high school, putting on a burst of speed, surged 
ahead. The final score was 47-38 in favor of the high school. 

On January 4, Plymouth traveled to Hingham. At the end of the 
half, Plymouth was leading, 24-16. The third quarter was poorly played 
by Plymouth and Hingham cashed in 'on their mistakes. The final score 
was Hingham 47, Plymouth 37. 

The Plymouth girls next played Rockland at Plymouth. The Rock- 
land girls proved too strong for Plymouth, who was never ahead. When 
the buzzer sounded, Rockland had won, 35 to 21. 

On January 13, Plymouth traveled to Middleboro only to be defeated 
by a score of 55-45. Both teams played a good game and Plymouth al- 
most overcame their opponents in the last quarter, when they put on a 
burst of speed. 

Plymouth was visited by Silver Lake on January 16. Plymouth was 
playing good ball which was evident by the score at the half, 31-8. 
Plymouth's entire first team saw action and although Silver Lake began 
to hit in the second, Plymouth won a well-played game, 39 to 29. 

The following Tuesday, the Plymouth girls swamped Bridgewater, 
55-31. Because Plymouth played well with fine passing and ball stealing, 
they had an easy victory. 

On January 23, the Plymouth girls played their best game of the 
season thus far against Abington. The guards repeatedly stole the ball 
while the forwards concentrated on making the score higher. But in the 
end, Plymouth's gallant efforts were in vain. The final score was Abing- 
ton 42, Plymouth 39. 



PILGRIM DRUG COMPANY, Call Plymouth 2055 



116 





The Plymouth girls played one of their worst games of the year on 
January 27, when they were defeated by Rockland, 36 to 19. The score 
was knotted at twelve all at the half, but Plymouth went into their usual 
third period slump while Rockland repeatedly scored. Plymouth was 
never able to overcome the Rockland lead. 

On February 1, the Plymouth girls turned the tables on Hingham, 
a team they had previously lost to. Both teams were determined to win 
and displayed a fighting spirit. The final buzzer showed Plymouth on the 
top, 47 to 45. 

During the next game, Plymouth again defeated a team that had 
previously over-powered them, proving that determination pays off. 
This time the victims were the Middleboro girls. The game was close 
but Plymouth won, 46 to 42. 

On February 8, Plymouth played another inspired game and handed 
Marshfield, the South Shore Champions, their first defeat of the season. 
The guards played an excellent defense while the forwards rolled up the 
score. The final bell showed Plymouth had won, 43 to Marshfield's 32. 

For the second time, Plymouth's girls swamped Silver Lake, 37 to 
21. Their opponents were no match for Plymouth and our victory was 
a comparatively easy one. 

On February 13, the Plymouth girls won their fifth straight game by 
defeating Bridgewater, 62 to 51. Previously, Plymouth had swamped 
Bridgewater, but an improved team gave Plymouth a run for their 
money. Plymouth's spirit proved just too much for the opponents. 

In their last battle of the season, Plymouth lost to an inspired Abing- 
ton team, 64 to 50. Both teams were anxious to win and played well, but 
no matter where the Abington girls shot from, they couldn't miss. 

Plymouth girls' first team finished their basketball season with a 
fair record, having won 8 and lost 6. Many thanks go to Miss Knight for 
her tireless efforts in coaching us. Although our record is not spectacular, 
our spirit is worth a great deal more. 





GOODING'S JEWELRY, Class Rings and Fine Jewelry 



117 



TENNIS 1955 



Plymouth 


4 


Hingham 1 


Plymouth 


4 


Duxbury 1 


Plymouth 


4 


Scituate 1- 


Plymouth 


4 


Hingham 1 


Plymouth 


4 


Duxbury 1 


Plymouth 


4 


Scituate 1 




Left to Right: Miss Marjorie Knight, Nan Richardson, Marietta Nelson, Caro- 
lyn Holmes, Jacqueline Nunez, Jeanette Basler, Carol Melahoures, Jean 
Freyermuth. 



SOFTBALL 1955 




Plymouth 1 

Plymouth 18 

Plymouth 19 

Plymouth 19 

Plymouth 9 



Top Row: Miss Marjorie Knight, Janet Balboni, Elsie Maki, Vivian Douylliez, 

Lorraine Surrey, Jacqueline Nunez. 
Bottom Row: Tara Sturgis, Shirley Williams, Carolyn Holmes, Ernestine 

Zinani, Carol Melahoures, Jean Freyermuth, Jeanette Basler. 



Hingham 4 

Rockland 23 

Abington 9 

Bridgewater 12 

Middleboro 5 



JOHN HAMILTON, INC-, 121 Main Street, Kingston 



118 







CawrnAA, \?ype/ "frfr^O^? YHe ?" Z/ot-jtocj ?jfo6 £i<tt / 




'iP^/io^ " J%2^ £Wjte^J5^ llkat^JM^Cfatei Stud/JklL Jnooz.fAf 






J$ea.Lc6.i&s *J%r> fitesLdend Curiam Got/i^ Zt/o / 



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"<P/v/*oocti j/lsLStkoo/' 





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119 



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/l^JL /lyt^u^r jL /QjJUL, /y*MjL* /uL±s >^L/^/t- vS-Jj-Aju. 



120 



■ 



Congratulations to the Class of 1956 



G V) 




6 - 8 Court St. 
Plymouth 



H 



T Mfcsvrw/y,>& 




122 






TEXTILE WORKERS UNION 


Congratulations to the 


SENIORS 


of AMERICA 


of 1956 




Affiliate of the 


P 




A.F.L. * C.I.O. 






Plymouth Rock Joint Board 


u 




Earl Harper, President 


R 




Lawrence Mossey, Sec. - Treas. 


1 






T 




Compliments of . . . 


A 




*"*! 






#w 


N 




Yankee /^y^^^a, 

Baft ud Contort ^^\^ V 
Off Tit Bmj Highway IM 


S 




^vJh~ 






Route 3 Plymouth 


Latest clothes for the 


Graduate 



123 



Compliments of . . . 



EDES MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 




PLYMOUTH LUMBER COMPANY 



Robbins Road 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



124 



PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 




Compliments of 



Plymouth Bottling Works 

181 Court Street 

Phone 1623 



Anthony Pioppi, President 



DELANO & KEITH 




Surveyors 

and 
Engineers 



125 






Otilt/ •• • • 

your friends can come, tool 



When you go to work for the Telephone Company, you'll 
find yourself in the midst of a pleasant, congenial group your 
own age. 

WORKING FOR THE TELEPHONE COMPANY 
OFFERS MANY ADVANTAGES 



^ Good starting salary — regular raises 

"A - Responsibility in a position of real im- 
portance to your community 

"A" The pleasure of working with congenial 
people in pleasant surroundings 

~k A secure job with a reliable company 
that's known and respected everywhere 



There are lots of excellent opportunities for 
girls finishing High School. Come in and talk to us 
today. We'll be glad to give you all the details. 

Talk with your Guidance Counselor, if your 
school has one, about when and where to apply 

# We're looking forward to seeing you. 



NEW ENGLAND TELEPHONE 
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY 






126 



Northeastern University 

BOSTON 15, MASSACHUSETTS 

You are cordially invited to explore the advantages of 

CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Nearly 3000 young men and women now enrolled as upper- 
classmen in the DAY COLLEGES at NORTHEASTERN 
are profiting from study on the CO-OPERATIVE PLAN. 

Programs lead to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 



COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS 
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



The combination of academic instruction at NORTHEASTERN and supervised 
co-operative employment in business, industry, and the social agencies consti- 
tutes sound preparation for a wide variety of responsible positions. 

"Co-op" students earn a major portion of their college expenses. 

EVENING DIVISION 

Programs available in the fields of Liberal Arts, Business, 
and Engineering lead to appropriate bachelor or associate degrees. 



SEPTEMBER REGISTRATION 



SCHOLARSHIPS 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Director of Admissions 
Boston 15, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog. ! am particularly interested in the 

DAY COLLEGES EVENING SCHOOLS 

□ College of Education □ Evening Division of the College of Liberal Arts 

□ College of Liberal Arts □ School of Business (Evening Sessions) 

□ College of Engineering □ Lincoln Institute (Engineering Courses) 

□ College of Business Administration 



Name. 



Address. 
H 



(Street) 



(City or Town) 



(P. O. Numerals) 



(State) 



■ 



■ 



127 



Compliments of 










A. L. ELLIS INCORPORATED 










Plymouth 


MABBETT WORSTED MILLS 








O 

fD 
Q. 

worsted • fabrics 

5T 














a" 
o 










Located on 


historic 






Plymouth 


harbor 






Plymouth, 


Massachusetts 




STALEY COLLEGE 






Founded 1900 




Coeducational 


Liberal Arts 




Majoring in Speech, Radio 
Education, Theatre 


162 Babcock Street, 


Brookline, Massachusetts 







128 



Plymouth Federal 
Savings and Loan Association 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 
Inc. 1882 Fed. 1937 



Chairman of the Board 
James R. Chandler 

Vice Chairman of the Board 
Harry R. Talbot 

Treasurer 
A. Lee Roulston 



Assistant Secretary- 
Mae E. Emond 



President 
Robert J. Tubbs 

Vice President 
Walder J. Engstrom 

Assistant Treasurer 
Fred C. Brown 







At Your Service For 
INSURED SAFETY FOR SAVINGS 
HOME MORTGAGE LOANS 
Planned for Your Budget 



129 









mmm 





i 


■■' 


E "" 1 











THIS IS 



RADIO STATION 



W P L M 



1390 on your dial . . . 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 






130 



PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 

The Friend/if Bonft" 




Friendly Service from these 
Friendly People — 



ALLEN D. RUSSELL, TREASURER 
ARTHUR G. ESTES, JR., ASS'T. TREASURER 
DONALD W. HEATH, TELLER 
HELENE R. PIRANI, TELLER 
PATRICIA A. DARSCH, TELLER 



wi 



w^mm 



131 




GOGGIN & SON 



FURNITURE COMPANY 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 



PLYMOUTH COUNTY 
ELECTRIC COMPANY 






CRANBERRY ACRES 



Route 3 



Manomet 



"Rendezvous to the Cape' 



132 



Congratulations and Best Wishes 
To the Class of 1956 



R. B. CORCORAN COMPANY 

of 
Hyannis 



Compliments of 



CARTMELL 

Funeral Home 



TOWN BROOK SERVICE STATION 

Mando's 



International Sales and Service 



. . . 24-Hour Road Service 



14 Water Street 



Plymouth 820-W 



W 



W 



Compliments of 

The North Plymouth 

Merchants Displaying 

This Seal 



133 




134 








Congratulations Seniors 






John E. Jordan Company 








Builder's Hardware 


PLYMOUTH 






Electrical Supplies 


GLASS 






Sporting Goods 
Garden Tools 


COMPANY 






Housewares & Appliances 








Kitchen Planning 


158 Court St. Plymouth 
Phone 1835 






If it is . . . 








Jordan has it! 


Compliments of . . . 

SOUTH SHORE THERMO 
EQUIPMENT DEALER, INC. 






1 Main Street Plymouth 


2 Court Street Plymouth 

Telephone 
2015 











H 






135 



THE OCKERS COMPANY 

Your headquarters for — 

— Books — college outline series 

— Dictionaries — Greeting cards 

— Brief cases and school supplies 

— Portable typewriter sales and service 

15 Main Street Plymouth 



Telephone 2255 



ANGIE'S MUSIC SHOP 

"The shop where music is boss" 



16 Main St. Ext. 
Telephone 1932 



Plymouth 



fwums; 




Compliments of . . . 



MALAGUTI BROTHERS 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



■ 



I . < I 



136 







• 


*%^^k 


ui* t Jr 


irl 






~~**"-~ * *^^^^B 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

SENIOR CLASS 



WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 



65 Main Street 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



BENEA BLOCK COMPANY 



32 Main St. 



Kingston 



First 

in Quality 

Fairest 
in Price 

Fastest 

in Service 



Plymouth Recapping Inc. 



and 



Plymouth Redistributing Co. 

of Plymouth 



Cott Quality Beverages 



Guy and Pete Brigida 



hZWi 



137 



KINGSTON LUMBER COMPANY 

14 Main Street, Kingston, Mass. 

* Building Materials 

* Lumber 

* Builders' Hardware 

Call Plymouth 1665 



L. E. BOUCHARD CO., INC. 

Plumbing and Heating 



Kingston 2183-2275 
Nights: Kingston 2183 



82 Main Street 



Kingston 




Congratulations 
to the Seniors 



M & M SPORTING GOODS COMPANY 

Telephone 1915 25 Main Street 






138 




Compliments of 



/five cents 
savings bank 

/NCO/tPORATCD I6SS 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



w 



Compliments of 



FORN SIGN COMPANY 



139 



315 Court Street 



North Plymouth, Massachusetts 




Piitt&u o£ ~76e PUpUtn 



Congratulations to the Class of 1956 



HATCH ELECTRICAL COMPANY, INC. 



12 Market Street 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



140 



NOOK FARM DAIRY 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



141 




LORING'S 



Established 1894 



Watchmakers & Jewelers 



25 Main Street 



Plymouth 



■ - „ . 



Compliments of . 



DUNLAP'S OIL SERVICE 



Gulf oil products — Bottled gas 



Russell Avenue 



Plymouth 



WALTER U. SCHROEDER 

Real Estate and Insurance 

Office: 17 Ley den Street 
Plymouth 878 

Sales Assistants 

Meta Traynor 
Jones River Drive 
Kingston 2295 

Dorothy Finch 
Jones River Drive 
Kingston 2763 



>';-<? 



386 



142 




Forges Farm Inc. 



'Quality Dairy Products' 



Chiltonville, Massachusetts 



Congratulations to the Seniors 
of 1956 

MRS. JAMES SWANTON 

Realtor 



39 Main Street 



Plymouth 1335-W 



Wiggin Tire & Home Supply Co. 

108 Court Street 
Plymouth, Massachusetts 

Gordon M. Wiggin 

Goodyear Seiberling 

TIRES 

NEW USED and RECAPPED 



143 




The Plymouth National Bank 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 







The way to Security 



iKfl 



144 




SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



Sales 



Ztfad' 



Service 



Phone 1407 



C5K 




DEARN and McGRATH 



"Eating by the Sea" 



Clam Bakes 



Lobster 



Plymouth, Massachusetts 



145 





FRIENDS 


Rebuttini's Grocery 


Sears Roebuck Company 


Milton Geller 


Reliable Cleaners 


People's Super Market 


Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Russo 


Paul Cingolani 


Garden Shop 


Samoset Press 


Old Colony Laundry 


Tavernelli's Barber Shop 


Primo's Service Station 


Guild Jenny Station 


Plymouth Rock Grocery 


Western Auto 


Louis Barber Shop 


Plymouth Rock Hardware 


Town Shoe Service 


James R. Garrity 


Tilo 


Bent's Esso Station 


Samoset T.V. and Radio 


Jim's Restaurant 


Cherry's Service Station 


Anti's Tailor Shop 


Marois Market 


Bell Shop 


Bluebird Restaurant 


Hogan's Drug Store 


Park Avenue Service Station 


Reardon's Beauty Shop 


Crowell's 


Brenner's Paint Shop 


George M. Sylvia and Son 


Plymouth Electronics 


Vic's Service Station 


Jabez Corner Service Station Cedarville Lumber Company 



IMI 




KdP 






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